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Tanker Augustina

February 6 2014 at 9:09 AM
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Tom Womack  (no login)

 
Hi All...

I've read through a couple of different threads posted several years ago regarding the tanker Augustina. Has there ever been any resolution as to which Japanese DD was the culprit which massacred her crew? So far as I can tell from a cursory read through the various threads is that Augustina's crew apparently witnessed the death of USS Pope some 14-15 miles to the south before being intercepted herself. This DD was apparently one of those screening the Japanese heavy cruisers which sank Exeter and Encounter.

Thanks...
Tom

 
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Melmoth the Wanderer
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No evidence AUGUSTINA saw POPE's sinking, n/t

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February 6 2014, 8:53 PM 


 
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KevinD
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Agreed, no and no

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February 7 2014, 3:42 AM 

Hi Tom,

Unfortunately, re the name of the ship that massacred the crew, as far as I am aware, no. I personally spent a great deal of time some years ago liaising with a very knowledgeable person / author (with regards the IJN) - who also had an abiding interest in the question - trying to sort that mystery out and we never could reach a definitive conclusion. Several times we thought we were very close, only to run up against a brick wall. All we eventually came up with was that it may not have been a DD at all.

As for Augustina witnessing Pope's sinking, again no. Only a inference, from what is written in the book Japans Blitzkrieg by Bernard Edwards - and given we now know from where her wreck lays that she was in the vicinity - that she may have seen the planes that attacked Pope and heard the bombing. Attached is an excerpt from said book. And that inference, IIRC, given the timing of the attack, was that Pope was the only ship being attacked from the air in the vicinity of where we now know Augustina was at the time (which was certainly not off Bali as the author asserts.)

If one just goes on the bearings, that is where he states that Moerman (Augustina's captain) said the planes came from (north) and where the explosions were heard ("in the direction of Lombok Strait" - which would have been south east if she was north of Bali) then it 'fits' for what could have been an attack on Pope (given that we also know approximately where Pope was circa that time).

Save for the silly reference to seeing the 'tall peak on the island of Bali to starboard' - which Moerman surely didn't say - and a few other oddities (he names the Jap ship as the DD Harukaze) it seems much of what he has written though may have came from Moerman / or a report that Moerman made re the sinking and aftermath, and is the most (only?) detailed account I have seen of Augustina's sinking, and runs for seven pages in the book.


[linked image]

 
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Melmoth the Wanderer
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Don't take Edwards' account at face value either

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February 8 2014, 4:40 AM 


Caveat lector.

The account is filled with made up details which seem to have been fabricated by Edwards himself. They certainly do not appear in the statements(s) given by the sole survivor of the incident.

Nor is this the first book produced with such dubious 'historical' facts by the (extremely prolific) Edwards, for that matter.

So, read it with care, and utilize it--if necessary--with even more caution.

MthW

 
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KevinD
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I thought as much

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February 9 2014, 2:43 AM 

Hi Don,

Re your;
>>>>>The account is filled with made up details which seem to have been fabricated by Edwards himself. They certainly do not appear in the statements(s) given by the sole survivor of the incident>>>>


Yes, as I alluded to in my post, Edwards certainly took some creative license with his account. Unfortunately without seeing the originals one doesn't know just what is fact and what is not in the finer details (of his account) either then.

So it seems from your post that you have, or have seen, Moermans original statement/s? If so, where can one find these? Would dearly like to see copy.


 
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Jan Visser
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Re: I thought as much

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February 9 2014, 7:28 PM 

The son of 3rd Engineer L. Meijer posted his father's official report on Dutchfleet.net. Here it is:

Meijer1.jpg

Meijer2.jpg

Meijer3.jpg

The post on Dutchfleet.net is here:

http://www.dutchfleet.net/showthread.php/9754-AUGUSTINA-Massacre-question?highlight=Augustina

 
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Tom Womack
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Thanks Guys N/T

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February 10 2014, 4:38 AM 


 
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Kevin D
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For those that can read Dutch, two questions then please

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February 14 2014, 3:41 AM 

First, thanks for posting that report Jan!

Now two questions if I may for those that can read Dutch.

1) I see no mention in that report of the DD's name being Harukaze. So where did that come from I wonder, as its not just Edwards who claims she was the one (although it would seem in retrospect not to have been her).

2) Now, even in my dictionary 'translated' Dutch I see no mention of Jap overflight times, or bearings said flights came and went on (with regards 'bombings over the horizon'). So again, where did that come from in Edwards account I wonder?

 
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Jan Visser
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Re: Don't take Edwards' account at face value either

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February 24 2014, 6:25 PM 

There is another source that might warrant attention.

I just checked the official statement by L. Meijer. It does not mention the overflight of airplanes at all. Second, it does not mention the name of the destroyer (DD) either (not the one that executed the massacro nor the one that picked Meijer up eventually.

I checked a number of my secondary sources, and the description of Meijer's events is mostly derived from his statement (drawn up in October,1945), or a book called "Varen in Oorlogstijd' by S.J. Graaf van Limburg Stirum, published in 1948. The book was based on desk research, but also new interviews with World War II survivors, and it contains much more details than the original statement of Meijer has. Presumably, Meijer recounted his experiences to the author including new details.

"Varen in Oorlogstijd" mentions that "after lunch" (presumably 12 or 12.30), several Japanese bombers and waterplanes were sighted, flying on a southern course. They left the Augustina alone. Shortly after, the Augustina sighed the sprays of water of exploding bombs on the horizon. After about 30 minutes, the aircraft returned and again the bombers took no notice of Augustina. The waterplanes however approached the ship directly and followed every manoeuvre of the ship, but didn't drop any bombs nor did they machinegun the ship. Shortly after, a plume of smoke was sighted in the Northeast and a Japanese destroyer approached at full speed.

The odd thing is, is that "Varen in Oorlogstijd" mentions that the lifeboats cast off from the ship at 3 PM, whereas Meijer in his earlier statement said that the Japanese "destroyer" was not sighted until 4 PM.

Perhaps of interest is that the second destroyer "transferred Meijer to another naval vessel, where he found the crew of USS Pope, and was brought ashore on March 7 at Makassar.

Regards,
Jan

 
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Jan Visser
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Re: Don't take Edwards' account at face value either

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February 25 2014, 10:29 PM 

For those interested, I scanned the pages on Augustina from Varen in Oorlogstijd.

http://www.netherlandsnavy.nl/files/Augustina_extract.pdf

Jan

 
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KevinD
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A question that, HOPEFULLY, someone will answer this time. ;-)

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June 12 2015, 3:27 AM 

Even though no-one ever responded to my questions in my previous post, let me now try a different one. After all, as they say, if at first you don't succeed, try, try, again.

It is a question re the content of Meijer's first hand account of Augustina’s sinking attached in a previous post by Jan Visser on Feb 9, 2014.

In the few pages re the sinking in Edwards book (Japanese Blitzkrieg) he mentions Augustina being able to "see the tall peak on the island of Bali abeam to starboard" shortly after the second overflight by Japanese planes (i.e. when the planes were heading back north), that is just prior to her being approached by an IJN warship, supposedly - but unlikely IMO - the DD Harukaze. Now that we know (from the discovery of Augustina's wreck some years ago) that Augustina was nowhere near Bali, the only peak she could have possibly been able to see to starboard that day would be on Bawean Island.

So my question to those that can read Dutch is; Is there any mention AT ALL in Miejer's account/s about seeing a peak (whether Bali or not), or has Edwards just taken some poetic license in his attestation of that supposed peak sighting?

An answer / clarification re if there is anything in Meijer's statement re seeing a peak would be GREATLY appreciated to aid in some research I am doing re the events that day.

TIA (after all, one can always hope)!


 
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Jacques
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No, nothing.

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June 13 2015, 9:03 AM 

KD, there is nothing in Meijer's statement about the peaks of Bali or planes overhead. There has been much discussion about AUGUSTINA on this forum going back to 2008 and I cannot offer anything new but for your benefit I've translated Meijer's statement into English.( I'm confident that I have it quite accurate although our Dutch friends might not agree!) Here goes:

Extraordinary Ship's Declaration

On this day, Fourth October nineteen-hundred and forty-five, in front of Hendrik Bos, Consul-General of the Netherlands, at Manila, appeared LOUIS MEIJER, third engineer of the Dutch steam tanker "AUGUSTINA", size.....M3 gross, property belonging to N.V. Netherlands Indies Steam Tanker Company with homeport, s' Gravenhage, this I wish to make known as required by article 353 second part, of the Mercantile Law and declare as follows:

Departed Batavia on 27 February 1942 in ballast with Australia as destination. At around 4pm on 1 March 1942 a vessel was observed on the horizon. It appeared after some time to be a Japanese destroyer, which fired two shots across the bow to force us to stop.

Upon this, the captain Moerman, ordered the ship to be readied for scuttling, whereupon all tank cocks were opened and in the engine room, the sea cocks were damaged and the boiler was placed on springs (?? - don't understand the term). Upon this the whole crew received the order to proceed to the lifeboats.

I was placed in the boat with the captain, along with the chief engineer Van der Werwe, the 2nd mate, the radio officer and the assistant engineer. The destroyer signalled that we were to come alongside, which we did. The chief mate's boat was fetched by a motor boat.

The captain and the chief engineer had to go aboard and were taken back to the Augustina where everything had to be sealed again. After a while both returned to the boat. In the mean time, the Japanese had taken everything from the boat, like the charts, the E.H.B.O. chest, (?) food and drinking water.

The destroyer started steaming up with both boats alongside. Our boat to port and the chief mate’s boat to starboard.

The captain informed us that on the order of the Japanese commanding officer, we could go away.

In the meantime a machine gun and two "tommy guns" were set up on the deck of the destroyer.

At 1800 as darkness fell, the boats were released and we were motioned to row away. We were scarcely 5 meters away from the destroyer, which had stopped in the meantime, when we were fired on. Thereupon most of us jumped overboard. When our boat finally drifted against the destroyer, a Japanese armed with a "tommy gun" jumped into the boat. When I saw this I decided to dive and swim away under water. When I came up for the first time I was immediately shot at, however after the second time not again and I then swam away still further. I still heard shooting.

After a while the destroyer started sailing and disappeared. I did not see any boats or other persons in the water anymore.

The Augustina was still drifting and I decided to swim to the ship. Close by, the Japanese destroyer appeared briefly on the starboard side. Fortunately it disappeared quickly and I could go on board.
The work boat was still hanging from the davits, which I then released and found myself therein. The clock in the mess stood at 1 o'clock.

I still saw the Augustina drifting on the horizon till Tuesday morning 3 March 1942.

On the night of 3 and 4 March 1942, I was picked up by another Japanese destroyer.

To the commanding officer of the ship, I told a fictional tale, namely that I was sick. I woke up when water flowed into my bed; that I then noticed that the lifeboats and all aboard disappeared and that I not really knew what had become of the Augustina and her crew. The story was believed whereupon I was brought to Macassar and locked up in the prison. On 15 October 1942, I was placed on a transport to Japan, where as prisoner of war I was kept in Fukuoka No.2 camp until I was liberated on 12 September 1945.

Because of my stay in prisoner-of-war captivity it was not possible to make an earlier declaration before a capable Netherlands authority.

Furthermore do I declare that the above, through my done statement completely compares with the truth.
After reading the above and having compared the statement with me, Hendrik Bos, Consul-General of the Netherlands, we co-undersign.

(was signed) Louis Meijer

(was signed) Hendrik Bos

For same copy
Manila, 4 October 1945
The Consul-General



Hope this helps.

Regards,

Jacques

 
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KevinD
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A very big THANKYOU Jacques; so I wonder……….

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June 14 2015, 12:41 PM 

........if I could impose on you again and ask if you would be kind enough to take the time to have a read of the other doc Jan posted a link to and tell me if;
1) Any mention of route taken
2) Any mention of a peak (or Bali) in there?
3) If the actually name Harukaze (the supposed massacre culprit) gets a mention there?

The link;http://www.netherlandsnavy.nl/files/Augustina_extract.pdf

From what Jan has said above in another post re that book excerpt I presume not, but just wanted to be sure.

And again, thanks very VERY much for the speedy Meijer doc reply!!!!!! Much appreciated!!!!!

 
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nuyt
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culprits

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June 15 2015, 5:22 PM 

Not wishing to steal Jacques' thunder I can tell you the route taken was to head to Australia through one of the Eastern straits (so they headed east from TP). They had sailed for two days without any problems. No mention of Bali or a ship's name.

But this report is slightly different than the one posted above as it is based on the second hand report by a Dutch Navy officer who heard the story from Meijer in captivity. It would be worthwhile to verify KtZ Moerman's official report. Note that this is a different Moerman than the Captain of the Augustina!

I took note of your remark earlier that it may not have been a DD at all. That's a good line of thinking, I'd say. At Tarakan the KNIL coastal artillery mistook large IJN mine sweepers for "cruisers", so mistaking a minesweeper for a DD by a civilian crew is not unthinkable.


    
This message has been edited by nuyt on Jun 15, 2015 5:25 PM


 
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Jacques
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Still nothing new.

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June 15 2015, 7:22 PM 

KD, I'm in full agreement with Nuyt -despite him stealing my thunder!happy.gif

To make sure we're not missing anything, I've again done a translation of the complete excerpt while trying to stick as close as possible to the original wording - have a look yourself:

THE MURDER OF THE "AUGUSTINA"-CREW

On Friday 27 February 1942, the s.s. "Augustina", of approximately 3 100 GRT, property of the Netherlands Indies Steam Tanker Company, left the harbour of Tandjong Priok in ballast. Outside the minefields the captain Moerman informed his officers and crew that he had received orders to take the ship to Australia through one of the easterly situated straits. Apparently, through scouting, it was known that Sunda Strait was already closed off by the Japanese Navy. His orders were also to scuttle the ship if it was to fall in the hands of the enemy. The first two day went by without any hindrance, but on Sunday 1st March, just after lunch, the captain was warned by the officer of the watch, that trouble was threatening. It appeared that a number of Japanese bombers and also float planes came into sight but that they left the Augustina unmolested and flew in a Southerly direction. A short while later water spouts from exploding bombs were visible on the horizon. After half an hour the planes returned but also this time no notice was taken of the ship. The floatplanes however, came up right to the ship and therefore captain Moerman sent everyone down below to seek shelter in the destined shelter prepared amidships. He personally took the helm and went through repeated course changes to avoid the attacking planes. These followed every manoeuvre of the ship yet did not drop bombs nor fired their machine guns. After a while smoke was observed to the Northeast and very soon a Japanese destroyer at full power bore down on the "Augustina". As soon as he was convinced of its Japanese nationality, Captain Moerman stopped his ship and had the boats lowered, while at the same time the order was given to release the outboard cocks in the engine room and the tank cocks were opened. Well-equipped, the boats left the sinking ship at three p.m. The Japanese destroyer immediately came closer and ordered the boats to be brought alongside. Thereupon the captain and the chief engineer were ordered aboard and when they stood on deck, were first sprayed with a disinfectant sprayer. After about a quarter-hour both came back again and said that they have to return to the "Augustina" to close the cocks. With one boat from the destroyer they were taken back. The rest waited tensely for almost an hour in the boats, when the captain returned saying that the tank cocks were closed but that in the engine room there was already too much water to again bring the cocks to the closed position. Japanese sailors then got down into the boats and they removed all pieces of equipment. Captain Moerman was again taken to the destroyer's commander and after a quarter-hour he was brought back to his boat. Then the Japanese started their engines and took the boats in tow. It was already dusk and the men from the "Augustina" saw that the Japanese sailors brought a couple of chests on deck and also some guns. Many were terrified because the Japanese were already notorious for their cruel behaviour. After it was almost completely dark, the destroyer's commander stopped his ship and allowed the boat lines to be released. It was made clear to the occupants that they were to row away. The boats found themselves, one each, on both sides of the destroyer and when they were a small distance away, the murderers opened fire with machine guns and rifles. Different men were hit, some saw their salvation by jumping overboard. To this group belonged the 3rd engineer, Mister L. Meijer. Through the panic caused by the shooting, one of the boats drifted against the destroyer and Mister Meijer saw a sailor armed with a tommygun, jump into it and mowing down those still alive. Also at them, those in the water, he directed his firing and by diving, Mister Meijer escaped the massacre, though the bullets hit the water close to his head. Although he was still close to the boat he could not hear any signs of life anymore and after ridding himself of his clothing and with good luck he swam off into the darkness. After some time which he could not estimate, the swimmer suddenly saw a large dark mass close in front of him. It appeared to be the "Augustina" , which already had taken on a 35 degree list. Just as he wanted to climb aboard on the low side, he heard Japanese voices. To explore, he swam carefully around the ship and on the high side, he saw a destroyer lying, presumably the one that committed the atrocity. Fortunately it quickly came under steam and after once more swimming around the "Augustina" to explore, he climbed aboard. The work boat was partly lowered outboard on the low side. As well as he possibly could in the darkness, he put the boat into the water and tied it up, so that he could escape as quickly as possible, because the "Augustina" was getting more of a list. Completely naked, he wanted to protect his body and was so lucky to quickly find a dressing gown in one of the cabins. More crawling than walking on the heavily listing ship, he reached the mess room , the timepiece there showing one o'clock. His purpose was to find supplies and in the dark he found a pack which he thought to contain bread for the officers of the watch; he also found a filled bucket. With some effort he successfully got the bucket and pack to the work boat and worried that the ship might capsize, he released the boat, the wind driving it free from the ship. Tired through everything that he had experienced, he fell asleep and only woke up when the sun was already high. Hunger and thirst began to felt but he was satisfied with himself that he had supplies in the boat. He was deeply disappointed to find that unfortunately the pack contained dirty work clothes and the contents of the bucket was dirty washing water.
At a distance of four miles lay the "Augustina" with a heavy list still above the water. Immediately Meijer decided to return to the ship to collect supplies and water. With fear he discovered that there only was one oar in the boat and that the stern was damaged so that sculling apparently was not possible. The boat was still drifting further away from the wreck of the "Augustina" and Tuesday morning at sunrise only the masts and funnel was still visible. A new day of suffering through hunger, thirst and searing sunshine broke for the castaway and the chance of rescuing him was very small. That afternoon one Japanese plane came into view that apparently spotted the boat, for it came right at the boat. Having experienced the bloodthirstiness of the Japanese, Meijer jumped overboard to seek cover. The precaution appeared not to be superfluous because the Japanese gave one burst of machinegun-fire as he passed the boat. After living through this emotion and again in the boat, the castaway, tortured by the harsh sun, hunger and thirst, began to hallucinate. Every moment he thought he saw land, it then just appeared to be clouds and by evening on the second day, numbed by his suffering, in deep sleep, out of which he was woken by a bright light which shone right in his face. Frightened he jumped upright, heard a motor boat, but also voices speaking in the so hated Japanese language. In mortal fear, Meijer jumped out of the boat and swims away, but was brightly lit by a searchlight, taken out of the water by a motor boat and brought to a warship.
Realising that it was important to keep quiet about his fate, Meijer dished up a story at his interrogation, that comes down to him lying in bed when he woke up on his ship, finding that it was sinking and that the other members of the crew left hastily so that he had to resort to escaping by means of the damaged work boat. The story was believed and the castaway was not treated badly. A few days later, at sea he was brought over to another naval ship where he found the crew of the American destroyer "Pope", which while on 1 March escorted the English cruiser "Exeter", was sunk by bombs from Japanese planes. On 7 March Mister Meijer was brought ashore at Macassar, first locked up in the prison and afterwards interned in a prisoner-of-war camp.
In the camp, he made a statement in front of Kapitein-Luitenant ter Zee (Commander) H.C.W. Moerman, from which this story is taken. Two Chinese landed on Java made very similar-sounding statements. Commander Moerman realised that, if the Japanese discovered what Meijer had experienced, they undoubtedly would have him disappear because he was the sole survivor of one of the worst breaches of International Maritime law in wartime. The registration of all prisoners-of-war was then not completed and so he could be included in the technical services of the Navy, without being noticed. Afterwards he was taken over to Japan where he was freed in 1945.
The "Augustina" -drama was one of many war crimes committed by the conscienceless Japanese.

My comments with regards to your questions:
1. After clearing the minefields at Tandjong Priok, AUGUSTINA steamed Eastward to exit the Java Sea through one of the straits to the East of Java - nothing else is known about the route chosen.
2. Meijer admitted to not seeing land or the peaks of Bali whilst adrift in the work boat. He might have been hallucinating at the time but afterwards realised that he only saw clouds and reported this in his statement at the Macassar POW camp. No doubt, Commander Moerman (not to be confused with the master of the AUGUSTINA, A.J. Moerman) would have wanted to record the approximate positions of where the massacre took place and where the wreck of the AUGUSTINA was last seen. Moerman would have pressed for any possible clues.
3. There is no mention of the identity of any of the Japanese warships encountered by Meijer. If Meijer had known the name of the warship responsible for the murder of his shipmates, I have no doubt that he would have divulged this in the statement made in Manila after the war, if not, for fear of his life at the POW camp in Macassar. Both Commander Moerman and Consul-General Bos would have pressed for this information, in order to eventually bring the guilty to book.

Regards,

Jacques

 
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nuyt
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Thanks Jacques

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June 15 2015, 8:31 PM 

It would still be good - to rule out any mention of Bali and ship names, etc - to have Commander Moerman's report, because he would surely have pressed for more detail as Jacques suggests.

Note that there are three IJN vesses involved: the "DD" committing the crime, the vessel that picks up Meijer and the vessel to which he is transferred (the one with the Pope survivors). The latter can be easily identified as a DD):

(from wiki)On March 2, 1942, Ikazuchi rescued 442 survivors from the Royal Navy destroyer HMS Encounter (H10) and United States Navy destroyer USS Pope (DD-225). These ships had been sunk the previous day in the Second Battle of the Java Sea, along with HMS Exeter (68), in the Java Sea between Java and Borneo, off Surabaya. The survivors had been adrift for some 20 hours, in rafts and lifejackets or clinging to floats, many coated in oil and unable to see. Among the rescued was Sir Sam Falle, later a British diplomat.[8] This humanitarian decision by Lieutenant Commander Shunsaku Kudō placed Ikazuchi at risk of submarine attack, and interfered with her fighting ability due to the sheer numbers of rescued sailors. The action was later the subject of a book[9][10] and a 2007 TV programme.[11][12][13]

Due to this humanitarian act we could conclude that the Ikazuchi was not the ship that committed the crime.

 
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KevinD
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Well, AGAIN, I owe you a BIG thankyou Jacques.......

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June 16 2015, 1:55 AM 

.......for that translation, and also thanks for your input Nuyt.

I am in a bit of a rush at moment but wanted to just post the below so there can be no mistake about the course, 'more or less', that Augustina must have taken. Pin shows where her wrecks now lays, or hopefully still does if the dreaded salvors haven't found her yet. sad.gif

[linked image]

 
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nuyt
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Floating for days

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June 16 2015, 9:33 AM 

Is anything known about her exact moment of sinking? Augustina was still floating on the 4th as it appeared from the various reports and she could have been floating for several more days. That would mean the location of the wreck may be (relatively) far away - depending on currents, wind, etc - from the massacre location?
A quick google showed me currents in March in the Java Sea are normally westwards, so the tanker may have been much farther east when she was spotted or indeed closer to the place where Pope was attacked....Maybe this has been dealt with in other discussions?

 
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KevinD
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Re: Floating for days

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June 16 2015, 10:03 AM 

First thanks for the input Nuyt! As luck would have it I was looking at the thread when you just posted, hence my quick reply. (I will put an asterix * next to my questions here.)

So, let me deal with your most recent first. Your text in >>>> <<<<


>>>>Is anything known about her exact moment of sinking?<<<<<

As far as I know, no.


>>>>>>Augustina was still floating on the 4th as it appeared from the various reports and she could have been floating for several more days.<<<<<

I thought Meijer last saw her on morning of, or during, the 3rd.


>>>>>That would mean the location of the wreck may be (relatively) far away - depending on currents, wind, etc - from the massacre location?<<<<<

Correct.


>>>>>>>A quick google showed me currents in March in the Java Sea are normally westwards, so the tanker may have been much farther east when she was spotted or indeed closer to the place where Pope was attacked....<<<<<<<

Hmmm. The research papers I unearthed say in March, (actually Dec - March) currents flow to the east. But they also found them at times flowing north-west in Feb! (And I can attest first hand to currents not following the expected direction in JS at certain times.)


Now something from your previous post. You said;

>>>>>But this report is slightly different than the one posted above as it is based on the second hand report by a Dutch Navy officer who heard the story from Meijer in captivity. It would be worthwhile to verify KtZ Moerman's official report. Note that this is a different Moerman than the Captain of the Augustina!<<<<<<

*Just to be clear, you refer here to the excerpt from the book in Dutch (Varen in Oor.), correct?

So we have;
1) Meijers statement in 1945. (*Is this his only statement?)
2) The Dutch book in 1948 that, if my above assumption is correct, you say comes secondhand from a Dutch Navy officer?*

*So, besides Edwards much later account, are there any others statements or accounts that anyone knows of?

*And what of the supposed two Chinese survivors. Did they make statement's?

*And where did they come ashore, I have read both Borneo and Java, and it can't be both.

TIA

 
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nuyt
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OK

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June 16 2015, 1:00 PM 

I'll leave the discussion about the currents to the experts...happy.gif

As to the reports, yes, there must be 3 or 4 reports/statements dealing with this incident:

- Meijer's in 1945 in Japan;
- KLTZ/Commander Moerman 's report after the war that supposedly includes info obtained directly from Meijer during captivity in Makassar;
- two apparently anonymous Chinese sailors from the Augustina, debriefed by unspecified authorities.

There may of course have been other persons in captivity (of any nationality) that may have heard the story from Meijer himself...or through KLTZ Moerman...

So I would not yet rule out anything.

UPDATE: apparently Meijer made a statement in Sep 45 to the war crimes commision in Manila, as qutoed in Jungle Journal:
https://books.google.nl/books?id=7ps7AwAAQBAJ&pg=RA1-PR58&lpg=RA1-PR58&dq=tanker+augustina&source=bl&ots=7OFO3V_fYH&sig=CNR1_yk2QVP9q9uJ_gqUbPq6Dq4&hl=nl&sa=X&ved=0CGIQ6AEwDGoVChMI8oP3v4iUxgIVyMAUCh0kXAzV#v=onepage&q=tanker%20augustina&f=false


    
This message has been edited by nuyt on Jun 16, 2015 1:07 PM


 
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