<< Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Forum  

Why Is The Heartland Of America Being Ripped To Shreds By Gigantic Tornadoes That Are Beco

April 4 2012 at 9:52 PM
No score for this post
Anonymous  (no login)
from IP address 184.91.165.249

Why Is The Heartland Of America Being Ripped To Shreds By Gigantic Tornadoes That Are Becoming More Frequent And More Powerful?


The Economic Collapse
April 4, 2012

What in the world is going on in the heartland of America? Spring has barely even begun and we are seeing communities all over America being ripped to shreds by gigantic tornadoes. A lot of meteorologists claimed that the nightmarish tornado season of 2011 was an anomaly, but 2012 is shaping up to be just as bad or even worse. These tornado outbreaks just seem to keep getting more frequent and more powerful. For example, several supercell tornadoes ripped across the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area on Tuesday. People all over America were absolutely horrified as they watched footage of these tornadoes toss around tractor trailers as if they were toy trucks. Personally, I have never seen a tractor trailer tossed 100 feet into the sky before. This is not normal. CBS 11 meteorologist Larry Mowry told his viewers that one of these torandoes was as serious of a tornado weve seen in years. So why is this happening? Why is the heartland of America being ripped to shreds by gigantic tornadoes that are becoming more frequent and more powerful?

Up to this point in 2012, at least 57 people have been killed by tornadoes across the country. Thousands more have been injured and countless homes have been reduced to splinters. In fact, there have been a couple of small towns that have been essentially wiped off the map by giant tornadoes.

What we are witnessing is not normal. Prior to the horrific tornadoes that we saw on Tuesday, there had been 326 tornadoes in the United States so far in 2011. That is about twice as many as usual for this time of the year.

Overall, the United States only sees about 1,200 tornadoes for the entire year usually. The busiest time of the year for tornadoes is still a way off, and we are on pace for a truly historic year.

But it is not just the number of tornadoes that is the problem. Many of these tornadoes are immensely powerful. The following is how the local CBS affiliatedescribed the damage done by the recent tornadoes in Texas.

Multiple tornadoes threw tractor-trailers in the air, ripped the roof off an elementary school, leveled houses and shut down airline traffic out of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport as one of the worst storms in years hit North Texas Tuesday.

Baseball-sized hail punched holes through car roofs, and a Red Cross spokeswoman warned the breadth of the destruction may not be cleared until well into Wednesday. The mayors of Arlington and Lancaster declared a state of disaster following the storm strike.

There were even reports of massive debris balls in Dallas, Ellis, Johnson and Tarrant counties. These tornadoes picked up huge amounts of debris into the air that were just carried along by the storms. That must have been an absolutely horrifying sight to behold.

A lot of jaw-dropping footage from these tornadoes has already been posted on the Internet. For example, the following video shows tractor trailers being tossed about like rag dolls.


Have you ever seen anything like that before in your life?

I know that I havent.

Look, one bad year can be dismissed as a coincidence.

But two historically bad years in a row?

Many would call that a trend.

Last year, America experienced one of the worst tornado seasons of all time. Many Americans will never, ever forget the devastation caused by the tornadoes of 2011.

For example, National Geographic reported that a gigantic F5 tornado that ripped through the Tuscaloosa, Alabama area had winds of up to 260 miles an hour. If you drive through Tuscaloosa today you can see that they are still trying to recover.

And Joplin, Missouri may never be the same again after what happened to that city last year. The gigantic tornado that ripped through Joplin was called by some the deadliest single tornado in more than 60 years.

That mammoth tornado ripped a path of destruction through Joplin that was more than a mile wide and more than 6 miles long. You can see some amazing before and after photographs of Joplin right here.

But people dont think about what happened to Joplin much anymore because there have been so many other horrific disasters since then.

Overall, 2011 was the worst year for natural disasters in U.S. history.

Many were hoping that there would be a return to normalcy in 2012.

Unfortunately, that simply is not happening.

In 2012, we have already seen one of the worst tornado outbreaks ever recorded in the month of March in all of American history. A couple of small towns in Indiana were virtually completely wiped out by that outbreak.

Sadly, what we have already seen in Indiana and Texas may just be the warm up act.

The truth is that usually May is the worst month for tornadoes in the United States.

So how bad are things going to get this year?

How many other communities across the nation are going to be absolutely ripped to shreds before tornado season is over this year?

In 2009, there were 1146 tornadoes in the United States.

In 2010, there were 1282 tornadoes in the United States.

In 2011, there were 1691 tornadoes in the United States.

In 2012, we are on pace to far exceed the total we saw in 2011.

So would could be causing all of this?

Do you think that you have a theory that explains these tornadoes?

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
AuthorReply

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
69.208.129.175

Re: Why Is The Heartland Of America Being Ripped To Shreds By Gigantic Tornadoes That Are Beco

No score for this post
April 5 2012, 4:39 AM 

On average there are over 1,000 tornadoes in the United States every year.
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/severeweather/tornadoes.html

In the last decade we averaged 1,274.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tornado_climatology#Tornadoes_in_the_USA

The record number of tornadoes in the United States was 1,717 set in 2004.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050104115613.htm

The incidents obviously declined from that and remain well below that.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
168.215.92.19

Re: Why Is The Heartland Of America Being Ripped To Shreds By Gigantic Tornadoes That Are Beco

No score for this post
May 21 2012, 11:49 AM 

Time to resurrect this one with updated data.  A month and a half ago Hedsup was telling us that the heartland of this country was being ripped to shreds by gigantic tornadoes.  We were told the number of 326 at the time was nearly double the average.  Take a look at this chart from the National Weather Service:

[linked image]

The black line represents our current year and the other lines various upper and lower point limits.  The red line is from a record year, and the orange line a 75th percentile line.  I make this point to show you how Hedsup works, how he cherry picks statistical peaks while ignoring the statistical valleys.

At the time Hedsup was attempting to panic you regarding tornado intensity and frequency, the tornadoes for the year were indeed roughly matching the record setting pace set in 2004.  However, since that time the number of tornadoes has been below average for the last month resulting in the line for this year returning to between the 50th and 75th percentiles.  Put simply, after a fast start, the number of tornadoes for the year have returned to just slightly above normal for this time of year. 

Hedsup wants to know why I post this stuff.  Well, it's because true, provides a more complete picture of what is going on, provides insight into the flawed methodologies behind Hedsup's running apocalypse panics, and because you sure won't hear about from Hedsup.

 



"The world is a mess and I just need to rule it." --Dr. Horrible.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
69.208.134.74

Re: Why Is The Heartland Of America Being Ripped To Shreds By Gigantic Tornadoes That Are Beco

No score for this post
June 2 2012, 8:33 AM 

As you can see from the updated graph above, the number of tornadoes, after getting off to a fast start, is now down to nearly dead average.

You won't be hearing that from Hedsup, but he was Chicken Littling all over this Board telling you how it was on track to break the record. Not a whisper when it falls to average.

Why is that Hedsup?

Of course, there's no selling books reporting the normal.


"The world is a mess and I just need to rule it." --Dr. Horrible.


    
This message has been edited by KeithDB from IP address 69.208.134.74 on Jun 2, 2012 8:37 AM


 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
Headsupcall
(no login)
72.189.158.123

Re: Why Is The Heartland Of America Being Ripped To Shreds By Gigantic Tornadoes That Are Beco

No score for this post
June 2 2012, 9:13 AM 

Just for the record, Pinnochio Keith, I'm not the Anonymous who posted the original message on this thread. Did you post it in another utterly stupid straw man construction intended to discredit me?

Let's see how long this post stays up before you find it and delete it.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
69.208.134.74

Re: Why Is The Heartland Of America Being Ripped To Shreds By Gigantic Tornadoes That Are Beco

No score for this post
June 2 2012, 9:33 AM 

Quote: "Just for the record, Pinnochio Keith, I'm not the Anonymous who posted the original message on this thread."

Oh yes you are, you damn liar. That post is from IP address 184.91.165.249, which is one of the ones you use. It's the exact same address you used to post the exact same thing in this thread.
http://www.network54.com/Forum/594658/thread/1334867425/Why+Is+The+Heartland+Of+America+Being+Ripped+To+Shreds+By+Gigantic+Tornadoes

You also posted under that IP, with your name here: http://www.network54.com/Forum/594658/thread/1334420543/NOW+A+FULL+AND+COMPLETE+CONFESSION

Let's just keep this all up so everyone can see who the "Pinnochio" is.


"The world is a mess and I just need to rule it." --Dr. Horrible.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
Bob
(Login Freeperson100)
67.169.173.227

Even very frail tornados count

No score for this post
June 2 2012, 12:29 PM 

On average there are over 1,000 tornadoes in the United States every year.
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/severeweather/tornadoes.html

In the last decade we averaged 1,274.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tornado_climatology#Tornadoes_in_the_USA

The record number of tornadoes in the United States was 1,717 set in 2004.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050104115613.htm

The incidents obviously declined from that and remain well below that.

========================

Here is the thing. Tornados count even if they are as typical, extremely low grade and scarcely producing damage.

A 5 on one scale gets counted just like the 0 or 1 gets counted. Naturally a true measure in my view would be the more serious tornados. I understand that for deaths 1925 is still the record. I recall studying a major tornado from many years back that was enormous and followed a path that led it through maybe half a dozen states. I believe it ended around Indiana or perhaps a bit more east. But it started several states below that. It may hold the record for time ruining lives.

So, one more measure in my opinion has to be how far did it reach. If the tornado is a 200 feet diameter type 5, vs a type 3 that is a mile across, then size matters. While the 5 will destroy, a 3 sure will cause people to fly to protected areas.


 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
168.215.92.19

Re: Even very frail tornados count

No score for this post
September 5 2012, 7:10 AM 

Tornadoes are now down to nearly 300 below the average for this time of year.  Let's update what Hedsup posted earlier [italized portion reflects the updated portion]

In 2009, there were 1146 tornadoes in the United States.

In 2010, there were 1282 tornadoes in the United States.

In 2011, there were 1691 tornadoes in the United States.

In 2012, we are on pace so far to not even reach 1,000.  So would could be causing all of this?

Do you think that you have a theory that explains this lack of tornadoes?



"The world is a mess and I just need to rule it." --Dr. Horrible.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
Headsupcall
(no login)
205.188.116.198

Re: Even very frail tornados count

No score for this post
September 5 2012, 1:34 PM 

Sure, there's an answer, explained repeatedly. Try to let it sink in before you embarrass yourself with the foregoing foolishness again.

Drought. Fewer or no severe storms spinning off cyclones, fewer or no tornados.

Honestly, Keith, you deserve commendation for your success so far in life in spite of your intellectual and abstract thinking limitations. No doubt your family provides you tremedous encouragement and support. You're a fortunate young man so far, indeed.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
69.208.131.201

Re: Even very frail tornados count

No score for this post
September 5 2012, 3:40 PM 

So if there are more tornadoes that proves you are right and if there are less tornadoes that proves you are right?


"The world is a mess and I just need to rule it." --Dr. Horrible.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
108.213.242.106

Re: Even very frail tornados count

No score for this post
November 23 2012, 7:50 AM 

And we are now officially on par for the fewest number of tornadoes in recorded history.


"The world is a mess and I just need to rule it." --Dr. Horrible.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
Anonymous
(no login)
142.196.32.37

Re: Even very frail tornados count

No score for this post
November 23 2012, 2:08 PM 

Stupid is as studpid does. Stupider is obsessively hanging on to stupid opinions simply because you can't accept the possiblility that one of your opinions is wrong to the point of foolishness. Unfettered ego is a very insidious, malicious, treacherous and potentially deadly personal adversary, Keith.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   

KeithDB
(Premier Login KeithDB)
Forum Owner
108.213.242.106

Re: Even very frail tornados count

No score for this post
November 23 2012, 2:37 PM 

You clearly missed the fact that it was your opinion that was wrong. Yet another prediction fail on your part. And look with how you respond to that fact being presented to you. Think about the hateful name calling in response to the truth you just childishly engaged in.

Then ask yourself if you are doing what psychologists call "projecting."

"The world is a mess and I just need to rule it." --Dr. Horrible.

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
 
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Forum