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Isidore of Seville: Dalmatia is one of 7 Greece's provinces

June 12 2005 at 11:53 PM
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Nikas  (no login)

 
Isidore of Seville's seven Greek provinces include Macedonia:
by Nikas (no login)
In his ‘Etymologies’ Isidore of Seville thus describes the Greece he knew:

"Greece has seven provinces, Dalmatia being the first on the western side, then Epirus, Hellas, Thessaly, Macedonia and finally Achaea and the two provinces of the sea, Crete and the Cyclades." (22)

Graecia a Graeco rege vocata, qui cunctam eam regionem regno incoluit. Sunt autem provinciae Graeciae septem: quarum prima ab occidente Dalmatia, inde Epirus, inde Hellas, inde Thessalia, inde Macedonia, inde Achaia, et duae in mari, Creta et Cyclades.

 
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Isidore of Seville: Dalmatia is one of 7 Greece's provinces

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June 12 2005, 11:59 PM 


Dalmatia a Greek province
by Vlaho (no login)

Hahaha...That's priceless

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You do not know who Isodore of Seville is
by Sotiri (no login)

The only Dalmatians in Dalmatia in 600 AD were Greeks.

He introduced Greek philosphy to Spain around 620 AD.

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Haha...
by Vlaho (no login)

Sorry, but the vast majority of Dalmatians in 600AD were Romans/Vlachs, not Greeks.

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Please...what Vlachs?
by Nikas (no login)
Antiquities

To the foreign visitor Dalmatia is chiefly interesting as a treasury of art and antiquities. The gravemounds of Curzola, Lesina and Sabbioncello have yielded a few relics of prehistoric man, and the memory of the early Celtic conquerors and Greek settlers is preserved only in a few placenames; but the monuments left by the Romans are numerous and precious. They are chiefly confined to the cities; for the civilization of the country was always urban, just as its history is a record of isolated city-states rather than of a united nation. Beyond the walls of its larger towns, little was spared by the barbarian Goths, Avars and Slavs; and the battered fragments of Roman. work which mark the sites of Salona, near Spalato, and of many other ancient cities, are of slight antiquarian interest and slighter artistic value. Among the monuments of the Roman period, by far the most noteworthy in Dalmatia, and, indeed, in the whole Balkan Peninsula, is the Palace of Diocletian at Spalato (q.v.). Dalmatian architecture was Byzantine in its general character from the 6th century until the close of the 10th.

The oldest memorials of this period are the vestiges of three basilicas, excavated in Salona, and dating from the first half of the 7th century at latest. Byzantine art, in the latter half of this period and the two succeeding centuries, continued to flourish in those cities which, like Zara, gave their allegiance to Venice; just as, in the architecture of Trail and other cities dominated by Hungary, there are distinct traces of German influence. The belfry of S. Maria, at Zara, erected in 1105, is first in a long list of Romanesque buildings. At Arbe there is a beautiful Romanesque campanile which also belongs to the 12th century; but the finest example in this style is the cathedral of Tra. The 14th century Dominican and Franciscan convents in Ragusa are also noteworthy. Romanesque lingered on in Dalmatia until it was displaced by Venetian Gothic in the early years of the 15th century. The influence of Venice was then at its height.

Even in the hostile republic of Ragusa the Romanesque of the custom-house and Rectors palace is combined with Venetian Gothic, while the graceful balconies and ogee windows of the Prijeki closely follow their Venetian models. Gothic, however, which had been adopted very late, was abandoned very early; for in 1441 Giorgio Orsini of Zara, summoned from Venice to design the cathedral of Sebenico, brought with him the influence of the Italian Renaissance. The new forms which he introduced were eagerly imitated and developed by other architects, until the period of decadencewhich virtually concludes the history of Dalmatian artset in during the latter half of the 17th century. Special mention must be made of the carved woodwork, embroideries and plate preserved in many churches. The silver statuette and the reliquary of St Biagio at Ragusa, and the silver ark of St Simeon at Zara, are fine specimens of Byzantine and Italian jewellers work, ranging in date from the 11th or 12th to the 17th century.

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Dalmatia 614-802
by Vlaho (no login)

The Roman province of Dalmatia used to extend from the Adriatic Sea to the Drava and Danube Rivers. In 567 the Avars had conquered the Gepid Kingdom and had moved, together with their Slavic subjects, into Pannonia (the plains of Hungary). Conflicts between the Avars and the Byzantine Empire ensued immediately. Between 605 and 615 the Avars and their subject Slavic peoples raided the Balkans peninsula. The Roman settlements of Dalmatia's interior fell to the invaders, were wiped out. In 614 the invaders targeted the towns of coastal Dalmatia, most notably Salona, with such a ferocity that the coastal population evacuated most of the mainland towns (except Zara) and moved to safety to the offshore islands.

Soon after their mainland hometowns had been burnt down, the Roman Dalmatians returned to the mainland, to resettle it - the Salonans settled Spalato (Split, within the walls of Diocletian's palace); the Epidaurans founded Ragusa; on the ruins of Acruvium, Cattaro was founded. This event marks a new beginning in the history of a (smaller) Dalmatia, now confined to the Adriatic coast. It was characterized by her Roman heritage, and, by the early 7th century, christian. The hinterland was settled by pagan Slavs.
Dalmatia owed her continued existence to her own resilience; Byzantium, during the crucial years of 614-615, was incapable of sending support. Dalmatia further underheld communications with Ravenna.

The episcopal seat of Salona (now a devastated ruin) was moved to Spalato, a diocesis under the Exarchate of Ravenna. The Avar power had been broken after the failed siege of 627, and Byzantine authority now extended over both the Dalmatians and their immediate Slavic neighbours. In 641 the conversion of the coastal Croats was initiated. In the 720es, after an Imperial decree suppressing the veneration of icons, Dalmatia was in open revolt to Byzantium (727-730). In 751 the Byzantinians were expelled from Ravenna; Rome took over the function of ecclesiastical center toward which Dalmatia oriented herself. Byzantium now came to regard Dalmatia as a province in her own right (Thema Dalmatia) instead of an annex to Ravenna.

http://www.zum.de/whkmla/region/balkans/dalmatia614802.html

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How nice...still no Vlachs. I especially liked a couple of points:
by Nikas (no login)

Firstly, Isidore of Seville wrote his works after the Avar/Slav power was broken:

The most elaborate of his writings is the Originum sive etymologiarum libri XX. It was the last of his works, written between 622 and 633, and was corrected by his friend and disciple Braulion. It is an encyclopaedia of all the sciences, under the form of an explanation of the terms proper to each of them. It was one of the capital books of the middle ages.

Now out of your post:

Soon after their mainland hometowns had been burnt down, the Roman Dalmatians returned to the mainland, to resettle it - the Salonans settled Spalato (Split, within the walls of Diocletian's palace); the Epidaurans founded Ragusa; on the ruins of Acruvium, Cattaro was founded. This event marks a new beginning in the history of a (smaller) Dalmatia, now confined to the Adriatic coast. It was characterized by her Roman heritage, and, by the early 7th century, christian. The hinterland was settled by pagan Slavs.
Dalmatia owed her continued existence to her own resilience; Byzantium, during the crucial years of 614-615, was incapable of sending support. Dalmatia further underheld communications with Ravenna.

Epidaurus was of course a Greek city, and Ravenna was of course a Greek (Byzantine) military exarchate in northern Italy. So, it appears to me that Dalmatia was Greek.

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Too bad the Epidaurans who founded Ragusa...
by Vlaho (no login)
decided to speak a Latin language.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalmatian_language

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Too bad your only off by about 5-7 centuries...
by Nikas (no login)
Ragusan

Ragusan is the Southern dialect and it is derived from the Italian name of Dubrovnik, Ragusa. We know about it from two letters of 1325 and 1397 (and other medieval texts), but they show a language influenced heavily by Venetian, and not pure Dalmatian. Several words surviving are pen (bread), teta (father), chesa (house) and fachir (to do), which were quoted by an Italian, Fillipo Diversi, the head of school of Dubrovnik in the 1430s.

The Romans occupied the territory of Illyria between 229 BC and 155. The traders and the authorities spoke Latin and the inhabitants abandoned their language for Latin (in fact, the "Vulgar Latin"). It is noteworthy that there were several Roman Emperors of Illyrian origin: Aurelian, Diocletian and Constantine I.

The earliest reference on the language dates from the 10th century and it is estimated that about 50,000 people spoke it at that time.

Other languages influenced the Dalmatian, but without erasing its Latin roots (superstrates): the Slavs, then the Venetians. Several cities of the regions have Italian names.

The oldest preserved documents written in Dalmatian are some 13th century inventories, in the Ragusan dialect. A letter of the 14th century from Zadar shows strong Venetian influence, which was also the cause of its extinction soon after.

Now whether Roman was spoken in much of Dalmatia prior to the Huns and Avars is not in doubt, but according to your text the situation changed when the Byzantines asserted their dominion in the new Dalmatia, and there is nothing to suggest that Epidaurus ever abandoned Greek, especially in the light of the Greek speaking Byzantines.

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