Return to Index  

They could not buy or sell anything unless

July 27 2017 at 4:17 AM
Wayne  (Login vgretz_8)


Response to Pope as Anti-Christ

 
Rev 13:16-17 NIRV He also forced everyone to receive a mark on the right hand or on the forehead. People great or small, rich or poor, free or slave had to receive the mark. 17: They could not buy or sell anything unless they had the mark. The mark is the name of the beast or the number of his name.

Church Legislation on Heresy


When Constantine had taken upon himself the office of lay bishop, episcopus externus, and put the secular arm at the service of the Church, the laws against heretics became more and more rigorous. Under the purely ecclesiastical discipline no temporal punishment could be inflicted on the obstinate heretic, except the damage which might arise to his personal dignity through being deprived of all intercourse with his former brethren. But under the Christian emperors rigorous measures were enforced against the goods and persons of heretics. From the time of Constantine to Theodosius and Valentinian III (313-424) various penal laws were enacted by the Christian emperors against heretics as being guilty of crime against the State. "In both the Theodosian and Justinian codes they were styled infamous persons; all intercourse was forbidden to be held with them; they were deprived of all offices of profit and dignity in the civil administration, while all burdensome offices, both of the camp and of the curia, were imposed upon them; they were disqualified from disposing of their own estates by will, or of accepting estates bequeathed to them by others; they were denied the right of giving or receiving donations, of contracting, buying, and selling; pecuniary fines were imposed upon them; they were often proscribed and banished, and in many cases scourged before being sent into exile. In some particularly aggravated cases sentence of death was pronounced upon heretics, though seldom executed in the time of the Christian emperors of Rome. Theodosius is said to be the first who pronounced heresy a capital crime; this law was passed in 382 against the Encratites, the Saccophori, the Hydroparastatae, and the Manichaeans.—The Catholic Encyclopedia 1908

To receive a mark in one's forehead signifies to make an open profession of belonging to that person or party whose mark is said to be received.—A Symbolical Dictionary by Charles Daubuz

Marks also in the hands or wrists, were the tokens of servitude; the heathens being wont to imprint marks upon the hands of servants, and on such as devoted themselves to some false deity.—A Symbolical Dictionary by Charles Daubuz

Article from Encyclopaedia Britannica
Heresy
a theological doctrine or system rejected as false by ecclesiastical authority.

Heresy differs from schism in that the heretic sometimes remains in the church despite his doctrinal errors, whereas the schismatic may be doctrinally orthodox but severs himself from the church. The Greek word hairesis (from which heresy is derived) was originally a neutral term that signified merely the holding of a particular set of philosophical opinions. Once appropriated by Christianity, however, the term heresy began to convey a note of disapproval. This was because the church from the start regarded itself as the custodian of a divinely imparted revelation which it alone was authorized to expound under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. Thus, any interpretation that differed from the official one was necessarily “heretical” in the new, pejorative sense of the word.

This attitude of hostility to heresy is evident in the New Testament itself. St. Paul, for instance, insists that his gospel is identical with that of the Twelve Apostles, and in the later books of the New Testament the contrast in attitudes regarding approved doctrines and heretical ones is even more sharply drawn. In the 2nd century the Christian church became increasingly aware of the need to keep its teaching uncontaminated, and it devised criteria to test deviations. The Apostolic Fathers, 2nd-century Christian writers, appealed to the prophets and Apostles as sources of authoritative doctrine, and Irenaeus and Tertullian laid great stress on “the rule of faith,” which was a loose summary of essential Christian beliefs handed down from apostolic times. Later, the ecclesiastical and universal church council became the instrument for defining orthodoxy and condemning heresy. Eventually, in the Western church, the doctrinal decision of a council had to be ratified by the pope to be accepted.

During its early centuries, the Christian church dealt with many heresies. They included, among others, Docetism, Montanism, Adoptionism, Sabellianism, Arianism, Pelagianism, and Gnosticism (qq.v.). See also Donatist; Marcionite; monophysite.

Historically, the major means that the church had of combating heretics was to excommunicate them. In the 12th and 13th centuries, however, the Inquisition was established by the church to combat heresy; heretics who refused to recant after being tried by the church were handed over to the civil authorities for punishment, usually execution.

A new situation came about in the 16th century with the Reformation, which spelled the breakup of Western Christendom's previous doctrinal unity. The Roman Catholic church, satisfied that it is the true church armed with an infallible authority, has alone remained faithful to the ancient and medieval theory of heresy, and it occasionally denounces doctrines or opinions that it considers heretical. Most of the great Protestant churches similarly started with the assumption that their own particular doctrines embodied the final statement of Christian truth and were thus prepared to denounce as heretics those who differed with them. But with the gradual growth of toleration and the 20th-century ecumenical movement, most Protestant churches have drastically revised the notion of heresy as understood in the pre-Reformation church. It does not now seem to them inconsistent for a person to stoutly maintain the doctrines of his own communion while not regarding as heretics those who hold different views. The Roman Catholic church, too, draws a distinction between those who willfully and persistently adhere to doctrinal error and those who embrace it through no fault of their own, e.g., as a result of upbringing in another tradition. The term heresy also has been used among Jews, although they have not been as intense as Christians in their punishment of heretics. The concept and combating of heresy has historically been less important in Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islām than in Christianity.—Encyclopaedia Britannica Ultimate Reference Suite

 
    
Responses

  1.   Well, the mark on the right hand OR the forehead was not the sign of the cross. - Tomas on Jul 27, 2017, 4:34 AM
    1. Did you read fully my post? - Wayne on Aug 4, 2017, 4:20 AM
      1. Yes, I did read it fully. But that INC minister taught me it represents the sign of the - Tomas on Aug 4, 2017, 5:25 AM
        1. Mark of the Beast - Deacon646 on Aug 12, 2017, 10:26 PM
          1. Exactly. I think the mark of the beast was allegiance to Nero. - Tomas on Aug 14, 2017, 3:20 AM
            1. About two years before his death Nero was in Greece performing in theater - Wayne on Sep 1, 2017, 6:48 PM
              1. ok - Deacon646 on Sep 1, 2017, 9:32 PM
                1. You can deduce, persecuting the Christians was not in Nero's agenda - Wayne on Sep 11, 2017, 4:03 AM
                  1. So sometimes Nero was in Greece, and sometimes he was in Rome, and likely - Tomas on Sep 11, 2017, 4:28 PM
                  2. How can one deduce - Deacon646 on Sep 13, 2017, 12:26 PM
     
Find more forums on ChristianityCreate your own forum at Network54
 Copyright © 1999-2017 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement  

Wherefore a man shall leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife
and they shall be two in one flesh