Login  /  Register  
  Home  -  Forum  -  Classifieds  -  Photos  -  Links     

  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index  

screw in freeze plugs

August 19 2009 at 6:27 PM
  (Login johnarthurbach1)
Members

i have lots of info on FE Fords but there is nothing written about how to remove screw in freeze plugs on my '67 side oiler. Anyone out there have some good tips on this procedure?

 
 Respond to this message   
AuthorReply
Bobby Spears
(Login x4rdtech)
Members

Re: screw in freeze plugs

August 19 2009, 6:34 PM 

I have never on any of mine even tried to remove them.Why do you want to?They are not like the press in type,they don't go bad.

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login johnarthurbach1)
Members

freeze plugs

August 19 2009, 10:52 PM 

well, 2 of 6 have gone bad. 1 rusted thru and the 2nd was leaking around the edges. both under the motor mount location. have 6 new plugs and if i can get the 2 bad ones out i will replace all of them. i cant believe that no one has has'nt had to replace screw in freeze plugs at one time or another. the 427 is on an engine stand
so access is easy. have been thinking of a 1-1/16 bolt head jammed down into the socket (after cutting thru the bottom of the socket so the bolt head will fit deep into the plug) with 2 jam nuts on the bolt , heating the area with a flame wrench and wrenching them out. that is, unless someone comes up with a better solution.

 
 Respond to this message   
Carnut427
(Login Carnut427)
Members

Hex rods

August 20 2009, 12:57 AM 

are available in different metals including steel. Buy the size that fits in the plugs, get a socket to match. You'll want to get it (a couple?) heat treated. Tell them what you want to do with it and they'll know how to heat treat it. A special tool steel would be preferable but expensive because it would have to be hand made. Try this first.http://www.mcmaster.com/#steel/=39m5rz
Good Luck,

Dan

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login 57F600-390)
Members

Plugs

August 20 2009, 5:19 AM 

Do the heat and candle wax trick first . As far as making a tool to remove the plugs just take a long bolt with a head that fits the hex , heat and bend it to 90* and use a cheater pipe on it. Only use a grade8 bolt as lesser grades will not be tough enough. Usually when you heat them they loosen up.

Have A Good Day -- John

 
 Respond to this message   

Beoweolf
(Login beoweolf)
Members

Generally - as mentioned. Once in - they stay in.

August 20 2009, 9:55 AM 

Core plugs, screw-in ones are much thicker than the sheet metal steel or brass ones you normally get, I had never seen one that I felt the need to remove/ replace.

That being said: you are lucky that you didn't ruin the threads taking them out. I installed a set in an fe and a 302, years ago, using some kind of permanent sealer the machinest had - they survived boil-out when we rebuilt the engine. Never had any hint of a leak.

Glad that it worked out for you. I used to wonder what I would have done if it had come to that point...seems weird to have to toss a salvageable block over some bad core plugs. Now I see it might be possible to save it.


 
 Respond to this message   

(Login DEames)
Members

I had to remove one but I'm a cheapsqueak and didn't want to buy the socket

August 20 2009, 9:04 AM 

so I carefully drilled holes large enough so's I could insert a hacksaw blade and cut a large enough (+) across the plug close enough to the threads and gradually chipped away, broke, caved-in the brass without damaging the threads. I used a crescent wrench with hex stock to reinstall.

 
 Respond to this message   

Barry Byer
(Login BarryByer)
Members

I've never done it...

August 20 2009, 9:29 AM 

...but that is exactly how I would do it if I had to.
Go slowly, make the cut close and it should just tap out.


53 F100, Volare clip, 4 wheel disc 390-wide ratio toploader
[linked image]

 
 Respond to this message   


(Login MT63AFX)
Members

IMO, if the freeze/core plugs have rusted out it's a sign of a marine engine. Also, if....

August 20 2009, 9:08 AM 

........the plugs are rotted, I'd suspect the block's integrity is at risk also, Rod.

Mickey Thompson's 63 1/2 #997 S/S Hi-Rise 427 Lgt/Wgt Galaxie,
1957 C-600 Cab-over carhauler w/390-4V, 2-speed rear-end
FGCofA member #4908
MCGC member #75

"There will ALWAYS be an FE in my LiFE"

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login johnarthurbach1)
Members

screw in freeze plugs

August 20 2009, 10:15 AM 

no, it's not a marine engine. i bought the 427 in 1970 while working at Holman Moody. it came out of a '67 Fairlane. i replaced a tired 332 with the 427 in a '59 Ford 2 dr Ranch Wagon which rusted out and i saved the 427. i plan on putting it in my "73 Mercury Montego GT.

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login DEames)
Members

So John, as a former H/M employee, any good stories/experiences you can share?

August 20 2009, 6:06 PM 

N/M

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login johnarthurbach1)
Members

Holman Moody

August 20 2009, 9:05 PM 

you can see part of my story at http:www.superbirdclub.com/johnbach.html
Doug Schellinger of the Daytona Superbird club interviewed me at the '03 Ford reunion at Dearborn, Mi. Greatest car show in the history of car shows. I was there with Doug Schultz. owner of the #17 Holman Moody Torino Talladega, former owner of the #41
Holman Moody '72 Ford Torino driven by Bobby Unser at Riverside Ca. Raceway in it's one and only race. i was a pit crew member on David Pearson's #17 car in '69 and '70 and then on Bobby Allison crew when he replaced David. After moving back to Calif. in '73 i was asked by Glen Wood to be on the pit crew for David in the # 21 Purolator Mercury. i worked for Glen from '74 to '88 until they closed the Riverside track. Lucky? i guess. not enough space here, or time to tell it all. at present i have a all steel, all Ford '32 roadster i have owned since '53. it has a Alan Root built '68 302, C4, '76 Comet rearend, power front disc brakes, a Black '73 Mercury Montego GT (inspired by Davids #21 purolator Mercury), a '72 Torino Ranchero (w/429).

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login tomposthuma)
Members

Greatest car show...

August 21 2009, 3:28 PM 

That sure was. It was amazing to see. I hope i'm around for the Ford BiCentennial!

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login johnarthurbach1)
Members

my cars

August 20 2009, 11:37 PM 

if you will go to .....mercurymontegogt.com......you can find pics of my roadster and Merc. . also look at the #21 Purdolator Mercury at Ontario racetrack, and Doug Schultz's #41 Torino which i painted and lettered. that Torino is the only unrestored original NASCAR racer in existence. it's a little bit shabby and the paint is a little faded but is still original. Doug sold this car and bought the #17 H&M Torino Talladega. both cars have Boss 429's. Doug races the 17 at vintage stock car races against the 41 car. i was lucky enough to attend the vintage races at Infineon raceway last year. lots and lots of old stock cars. great fun.

 
 Respond to this message   
C5HM
(Login C5HM)
Members

We missed you this year John...

August 21 2009, 5:15 AM 

Any chance you will attend the Wine Country Classic next year?
BTW, go slow on the freeze plus with the impact gun. I've heard horror stories about chunks of block coming free with the plugs. I think I'd just try to change the two. Safer way may be to machine them out. Got any friends with a Bridgeport or a big drill press?

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login 428Dave)
Members

Re: screw in freeze plugs

August 20 2009, 9:30 AM 

I had no luck in getting a homemade tool to work but was able to purchase a large allen wrench from e-bay for about $6. I was able to remove freeze plugs on a Genesis block with it but not until I had the block out of the car. Spray the plugs with penatrant before trying to remove.

 
 Respond to this message   
Anonymous
(Login afret)
Members

Re: screw in freeze plugs

August 20 2009, 11:16 AM 



http://www.mcmaster.com/#53525a15/=39u2xn

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[IMG][linked image][/IMG]

 
 Respond to this message   

qikBBstang
(Login qikbbstang)
Members

LOL I guess I'm "King of the Creative Cheap" so I found a downright free big Allen Wrench

August 20 2009, 1:02 PM 

Found this idea in a Junk Yard when trying to pull a motor out of a Jap Cycle that was totaled and I had to leave the frame by law. Big Allen Wrench I did not have but I had plenty of bolts laying around, just found a bolt head that fit the allen head and put Vice Grips on it so it was half in ViceGrip and half in Allen Bolt. Obviously you could gain more torque ability by brazing the right size nut to the bolt so there's full contact. I'd bet some checking would find the right size SAE bolt head to fit a screw in freeze plug in a 427 FE

 
 Respond to this message   

Dr. Mabuse
(Login FE4RD)
Members

Aigs-actly...

August 20 2009, 5:10 PM 

...just weld a nut on a hex-head bolt that fits the hex in the plug. Heat the area around the plug with an acetylene torch (until red), and remove the plug.

[linked image]

 
 Respond to this message   

(Login johnarthurbach1)
Members

freeze plugs

August 20 2009, 9:07 PM 

that is what i have planned on doing. thanks. i'll let you all know the outcome.

 
 Respond to this message   
Current Topic - screw in freeze plugs
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index