Login  /  Register  
  Home  -  Forum  -  Classifieds  -  Photos  -  Links     

  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index  

OT, but Motorcraft carb. How do you test a black foam float?

October 3 2017 at 1:04 PM

Mike U.  (Login mtrain)
Members

I've been trying to build the complete carbs left over from my late fathers carb shop, and so far I've been lucky as all the carbs I've rebuilt so far were brass floats.

I know how to test brass floats, just dip into boiling hot water, and check for bubbles. Bubbles in a brass float means a leak.

However, I don't know the test for black foam floats. I've got two Motorcraft 4bbl carbs from a 1973 bb Ford engine, and both have the neoprene floats.

I just need to check, then set the floats, and I will be done...........thanks.


    
This message has been edited by mtrain on Oct 3, 2017 1:09 PM


 
 Respond to this message   
AuthorReply

r
(Login 427RComet)
Members

Re: OT, but Motorcraft carb. How do you test a black foam float?

October 3 2017, 1:26 PM 

Each float has a specified weight. Use a float gauge to determine weight.
I have a full chart here somewhere. The mechanical float gauges can be bought very cheap.

 
 Respond to this message   

Mike U.
(Login mtrain)
Members

I've actually got two of the little weight testers from the shop. I just don't have the ch

October 3 2017, 3:50 PM 

I just don't have the weight chart.

 
 Respond to this message   

r
(Login 427RComet)
Members

Re: OT, but Motorcraft carb. How do you test a black foam float?

October 3 2017, 1:34 PM 


 
 Respond to this message   
Don Ragan
(Login gdr45)
Members

Re: carb float scale,

October 3 2017, 6:51 PM 

That is what we used at Mercury Marine. Works very well. It is best to weigh the float just after it has been taken out of gas. Otherwise, it will evaporate out and give a false reading. Usually, we did not take a chance, and just replaced the float. But, be assured, a fuel logged float will cause flooding and or a rich condition.

 
 Respond to this message   
Jim
(Login FormerlyCyclonic66)
Members

float, submerge, float

October 3 2017, 1:40 PM 

If the material has broken down, it may absorb fuel over time. Observe the float in a small container of gas and note (or take a picture) of how it floats. Submerge it with a weight overnight and then observe it without the weight again. If there is no change, should be good to go.

If you're talking about actual plastic floats that are hollow, that's different. I would warm them up pretty good and then submerge them (opposite of the brass test). As they cool, they will pull in gas and you'll hear it sloshing around.

Or...go to Mike's carburetor parts and grab some new ones.
http://www.carburetor-parts.com/Ford-Autolite-Motorcraft_c_30.html


    
This message has been edited by FormerlyCyclonic66 on Oct 3, 2017 1:53 PM


 
 Respond to this message   

Mike U.
(Login mtrain)
Members

I actually did the submirged in gas test today [just as a thought], and.........

October 3 2017, 3:53 PM 

So far after being held down by a small hunk of metal, they still float.

 
 Respond to this message   

Mike U.
(Login mtrain)
Members

Heck, we ALL float down here............sorry for the "IT" movie reference.

October 3 2017, 3:56 PM 

We just saw the new movie IT last week [I read the book years ago, and watched the TV series back when it was new].

I have to say IT was pretty good, much better than the TV series........sorry for the OT post.

 
 Respond to this message   
 
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index