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Walther 55 - tuning oddity (odyssey?)

October 17 2002 at 1:04 PM

Arnold  (Login chardosmith)
YC

Previously HW-55 - tuning oddity (odyssey?)
Hello,
Recently received a W-55 from Germany. Couldn't stand to leave it alone with unknown internals. When taking it apart, found some odd design elements. One was a metal insert in the stock to guide the cocking linkage. Then there is a very odd piece of metal that is around 8 inches long and has a slot that sits above the cocking slot and has the cocking shoe run through it on its way to the piston. This same piece of this metal then thins and fits through a slot in the primary receiver bolt on its way to the trigger unit where it helps to place spring force on part of the sear mechanism.

The rear cap on the receiver unscrews with no preload and the trigger unit slides out along with an odd spacer - definately not a reckord unit. Now there is the cast bolt piece that holds tension on the spring and has a threaded section to attach the trigger guard - similar to the fwb-124. THis has mild preload and when removed, a very short spring -about 4.5 inches comes out. Then I pull the piston by and a second sping with a guide/coupler sits over the piston stem. Both springs are the same length and this guide is positioned such that it will alway be over the piston stem. The piston is long and has a blue synthetic seal. There is some dry lube on the inside, but very little.

Reassembling the gun was a chore. Lubing the inside of the guide made a noticable difference in the sliding over the stem. Moly on the ID of the springs and the light vel tar on the OD. The piston, springs and guide went in easily. Pressure with a deep well socket allowed bolt attachment. The real challenge was the trigger unit. It had lots of crumbly lube. I cleaned and molyed the trigger and reassembled in the receiver. The long spring thing mentioned earlier could fit several ways in the trigger unit. First assembly resulted in an autofire when straightening the barrel - three times. Then placing in a different position and the gun cocked, but required 6-7 pounds to break the trigger and no first stage. I then changed the adjustment on the trigger and reinstalled as intially - nice crisp trigger at a few onces. The gun is the easiest cocking springer I own and I'll post wome pics of the guts, groups, and diopter soon.

Mr Driskill - what do you think is the reasoning behind two springs? Possibly to keep the guide over the stem and limite lateral movementof the springs?


Arnold Smith
Acute case of airgunmania - keep the pellets flying!

Arnold Smith
Acute case of airgunmania - keep the pellets flying!


    
This message has been edited by chardosmith on Oct 17, 2002 2:44 PM


 
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AuthorReply

(Login Mac-1)

55 Walther

October 17 2002, 1:10 PM 

That had me going for a moment.


Later

Tim

 
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MDriskill
(Login MDriskill)
YF12

Check the name on the gun!

October 17 2002, 1:13 PM 

What you just described is not a Weihrauch HW 55. It is either a Walther model 55 or the later Walther LGV. The double springs sound like an LGV.

The long metal bit is the thing that blocks the trigger while the action is open--a very worthwhile thing to have in a springer. I believe you can override this and uncock the gun if you pull the barrel slightly past the cocked position and then pull the trigger (with a simultaneous VERY FIRM grip on the barrel of course).

The reason for the double springs was to eliminate the twisting motion imparted by the spring on a normal gun. They are wound in opposite directions and cancel each other's tendency to rotate when expanding. The thing between them is the spring guide.

Congrats on your purchase by the way--as much as I love the HW 55, the Walthers are less common and even more desirable guns.

 
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Arnold
(Login chardosmith)
YC

hmmm

October 17 2002, 2:40 PM 

Well, I will have to look more closely at the stamping. I was told the gun was an HW-55, but must be something a bit different. will post later with pictures.

Arnold Smith
Acute case of airgunmania - keep the pellets flying!

 
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(Login kiwidownunder)
YC

Walther

October 17 2002, 3:25 PM 

The internals are identical to my gun and that is marked as a Walther LG55.

Ian

 
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(Login RBest)
YFOT

My LG-55 only uses a single spring

October 17 2002, 5:36 PM 

could it be an LGV? RB

Russell Best
BesTunes
BSA Owners Club
C.O.P.S.
fax-(203)484-7382
BesTunes@cs.com

 
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MDriskill
(Login MDriskill)
YF12

Walther LGV vs 55

October 17 2002, 9:26 PM 

I was also under the impression that only the LGV had the double springs, but I suppose that they would fit in the LG 55. Perhaps it was a transitional model or simply a retrofit.

The real trademark of the LGV is the manual breech locking lever, I think.

 
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RossB
(Login RossB)
YF

Walther Luftgewhr LG55

October 18 2002, 8:31 AM 

The parts drawings that Walther sent me for my LG53 included the LG51 & LG55. They all show only one mainspring.

 
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(Login LWR)
YF

Walther LG55/LGV

October 18 2002, 4:52 PM 

Just to had even more confusion,I have an LGV with one spring over here.

 
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