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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 15 2017, 11:18 PM 

From the day before the Texans game.

Video: Is Marvin Lewis on the hot seat in Cincinnati?
Hub Arkush - Pro Football Weekly - Published: Sept. 14, 2017 — 5:31 p.m.

Following last weekend’s Week 1 blowout against the Ravens, could the coaching status of Cincinnati Bengals head coach Marvin Lewis be on the bubble this early in the season? As Hub Arkush reports, while the Bengals brass is patient, time could run out quickly for Lewis if the team doesn’t bounce back quick.


http://www.profootballweekly.com/2017/09/14/video-is-marvin-lewis-on-the-hot-seat-in-cincinnati/a64k9q7/


Arkush said that "one more game" like the first one could get Marvin fired. The offense had another awful game, and Marvin is still here. Because...

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 15 2017, 11:33 PM 

Of course Marvin's seat should be hot. That's not the point.

How hot should Marvin Lewis' seat be after historically bad 0-2 start?
Chris Roling - Bengals Wire USA Today - September 15, 2017

How hot is the seat hoisting up Cincinnati Bengals coach Marvin Lewis?

Is it hot at all?

Lewis entered this season, the final year of his contract, without an extension, meaning he couldn’t come to terms with Bengals owner Mike Brown. After years of one-year extensions, the lack of one here seemed odd.

And here we are. Cincinnati has started 0-2 in the worst way possible, failing to score a touchdown over eight quarters of play at home. No team had done that since the 1939 Philadelphia Eagles.

Blame has to fall somewhere. As of Wednesday, though, Bovada ranked Lewis only second on the hot seat:

https://t.co/x9KwwTLSL8

One has to think Lewis moves to the top of the list, right?

Maybe Lewis didn’t play a big role in letting both Andrew Whitworth and Kevin Zeitler go this past offseason.

But he did play a role in the 0-2 disaster. He sat idly by as Tyler Eifert received only five targets over two games. He watched A.J. Green, despite jaw-dropping plays in triple coverage, go ignored in the second half on Thursday, especially with the game on the line.

Perhaps worst of all, Lewis refuses to hand things over to rookie Joe Mixon despite poor performances from the other backs. He helped the team draft John Ross ninth overall this year, then gave him one touch and made him watch from the sidelines after he made one mistake.

There was even a curious situation with a former second-round pick, per Paul Dehner Jr. of the Cincinnati Enquirer:
Paul Dehner Jr.

Marvin Lewis says Tyler Boyd being inactive was NOT a medical reason.
10:42 PM - Sep 14, 2017

There aren’t many excuses here. Cincinnati has played two solid defenses, sure, but the Bengals have routinely owned the Baltimore Ravens over the years and the offense inexplicably didn’t adapt and target Green more or get Ross back on the field while Houston only had backup corners on the field thanks to injuries.

In the past, cries for Lewis’ dismissal seemed reactionary. He pulled the Bengals out of the cellar and had the team in the playoffs consistently. It was worth wondering if a different face could take the team to new heights after Lewis did the build to .500 and slightly better, sure.

But now? The Bengals have regressed, and it is impossible to ignore the hot seat.


http://bengalswire.usatoday.com/2017/09/15/how-hot-should-marvin-lewis-seat-be-after-historically-bad-0-2-start/


Oh, it's quite easy to ignore the hot seat because it doesn't even exist. Mike Brown will never fire Marvin Lewis.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 17 2017, 8:16 PM 

Let's learn a little more about Marvin Lewis.

FROM THE EXECUTIVE EDITOR

A coach’s life: The patient leadership of Marvin Lewis

Abraham D. Madkour - Sports Business Daily - September 11, 2017

Marvin Lewis didn’t know he wanted to be a coach growing up. But he knew he didn’t want to work in the Pennsylvania mills near his home.

“My dad worked in the mill, and he would work three shifts,” he told me, recalling the summer he worked in the coke mill. “I spent nine weeks in the mill one summer and it was nine weeks of hell.”

Football was his way out of the grueling job. “When it got closer to football season, the foreman would ask me if I wanted to work more, and I told him, ‘No, I’ve got to work out.’ I begged to get off of work the next summer too. That was hard work.”

Those nine weeks helped define Lewis, who focused on work ethic and preparation and turned a love of sports into becoming one of the longest-tenured coaches in the NFL. He begins his 15th year leading the Bengals, second only to Bill Belichick’s reign in New England. I’ve followed Lewis’ career since watching him in two installments of HBO’s “Hard Knocks,” where he came across as a smart, serious, yet compassionate coach and leader. I know the knock against him — an 0-7 playoff record who is known to have undisciplined teams. But I appreciate the full body of his work as a lifelong student of the game and a pioneer when it comes to diversity in the NFL. Through my relationship with his agent, Phil de Picciotto of Octagon, I was able to spend 90 minutes with Lewis in Scottsdale, Ariz., and on a cloudy, chilly Friday afternoon, Lewis met me at his front door, accompanied by his Welsh Corgi named Weslee and his Maltese Yorkie blend, Simba.

He had played golf that morning, (“I played terrible”) and was spending the last days in Scottsdale with his wife, Peggy, before going back to Cincinnati for the NFL draft.

We sit at a round kitchen table that looks out to his backyard. Wearing a black Nike golf vest over a white golf shirt and shorts, Lewis grabs some bottles of water, and wears an easy, shy smile as we settle in to talk about his life, career in coaching and thoughts on leadership. My impression of Lewis matched the man — quiet, kind, unassuming, and focused on leading by example through hard work and respect.

“I wanted to be an engineer,” he said with a slight laugh. “But the more I was in football, the more I wanted to be a coach. In high school, I was doodling football plays all the time.”

Sports surrounded Lewis’ youth, as he excelled athletically at Ft. Cherry High School in McDonald, Pa., where he wrestled and played football (quarterback and safety) and baseball.

With his father at the mill and his mother working as a nurse, Lewis grew up with two sisters and learned early the benefits of preparation and hard work.

“I did OK as a student. I had to make sure that I did the work. It certainly wasn’t easy for me. I would have to study and work at it to get a good grade.”

Lewis was going to walk on at Purdue University but was concerned about putting more pressure on his overworked parents.

“I was feeling bad about my parents having to pay for school because I didn’t have a full scholarship. So, when I got the opportunity to be on a full scholarship at Idaho State, that put it over the top and I went there.” He played linebacker and earned All-Big Sky Conference honors for three straight years. He started studying business, but changed majors in his junior year to education when he decided he wanted to be a coach.

“The more and more that I was around the game and the coaches, the more I really thought I could teach and help players. So as soon as I finished college, I began coaching at Idaho State. I’d teach and run the after-school football program for weight lifting. I was 22. I wasn’t getting paid, but I loved it.”

He got his master’s degree and began his career on the defensive side of the ball, coaching linebackers, where he was offered a full-time job in 1982, making $10,000, while able to live in the football dorm for free. In 1983, the day before he married Peggy, he received a promotion. “The day of our wedding, my income doubled to $20,000,” he smiled.

From there, Marvin and Peggy were on the coaching carousel and moved seven times in 22 years, going from Idaho State to Long Beach State to New Mexico to the University of Pittsburgh, all before the NFL. They had two children, daughter Whitney and son Marcus (who now coaches with his dad in the Bengals organization). It was a challenging lifestyle for any family. “When your kids are younger, it’s a lot easier to pick up and move,” he said. “But once they start school and make friends, it’s a lot harder.”

But while he gained experience and grew as a coach, Lewis wasn’t focused on the NFL. “No, I never thought about going to the NFL,” he said, shaking his head, while telling Simba to get down from jumping on me.

In 1998, Lewis was chosen to participate in Bill Walsh’s NFL Minority Coaching Fellowship program, and that gave him a taste of the NFL. “It was a really good experience,” he said. “Coach Walsh was very personable, and I learned a lot.”

Then in 1992, while serving as assistant coach at Pitt, he received dual offers to be special teams coach for the 49ers under George Seifert and the Steelers from Bill Cowher. “When Bill heard the 49ers were offering the same position, he changed the offer to linebackers coach and I told him that he had a deal. Going to coach for your hometown team? That was great.”

But even when coaching for Cowher and later Brian Billick and Marty Schottenheimer, he focused on the job at hand and not his next career move, which he thinks is a problem with too many young coaches today.


“I was just trying to be the best defensive coordinator that I could be,” he said. “I literally never thought about being a head coach. I tell young coaches all the time to just be the best coach they can be at what they’re doing. People call you because of the job that you do, as opposed to you saying, ‘There’s a job over there, I’m interested in that.’ Too many times, coaches will get caught up in, one, chasing jobs, and, two, worrying about how much they’re going to make.”

After coaching smothering defenses at both the Ravens (where his defense led to a Super Bowl title in 2001) and the Redskins, he was hired by the Bengals in 2003, replacing Dick LeBeau, who was coming off a 2-14 year, which marked the worst record in the organization’s history. For team President Mike Brown, Lewis instantly brought stability, while reinstating respect to the wobbly team. Over his 14 years, Lewis has gone 118-103-3 and made the playoffs seven times. But he’s entering a pivotal year, as the team is coming off a disappointing 6-9 record and he is going into the final year of his contract. And while on the hot seat, Lewis carries himself with a steady, calm style. During our conversation, he deflects all contract talk and remains focused on work ethic and attitude, much like he did growing up in Pennsylvania.

“The best players want to be coached. If you aspire to be a great NFL player, you’re going to work to be the smartest and best prepared. Many young kids take that for granted. They think it’s just about being a superior athlete. Yes, they all have good-to-great athletic ability, but the ones that play the longest are also the smartest. It’s so much easier to coach a hard worker.”

It’s his emphasis on hard work — balanced by patience — that has shaped his coaching style.

“The talented player may not work very hard. You have to have patience to help him develop and gain the work ethic. You’ve got to take the talented player and get him to understand how his work ethic will help shape his career and make him a better player. Some people are unfortunately naturally lazy and you’ve got to help them see the light. Because in order to be great, you’ve got to work hard. Hard work is essential to being great. The Hall of Fame players that I’ve had the opportunity to coach and be around are extremely hard workers.”

Lewis believes a common mistake in today’s coaching is a lack of patience. “You don’t give a player enough time. The talented player through high school and college may not meet the work ethic standards of the NFL. That player has never been pushed to those limits. Some don’t give that player the opportunity to grow; you aren’t able to pull that out of him quick enough. Then when the player goes to another team and you see him flourish, you wonder why? Well, it’s because you didn’t give him that opportunity.”

He admits the pain in coaching in seeing the player who has done everything asked of him, arrive early, stay late, and work extremely hard, just not be able to make it.

“Sometimes the hardest worker and the guy that is in there first every day, may be the guy that we ask to leave. That’s hard. You want to see that player succeed because of what he’s invested in it. But it doesn’t always happen.”

Over the years, Lewis has faced critics over his lack of playoff success and the attitudes or backgrounds of some of his players. This year, the Bengals drafted controversial running back Joe Mixon from the University of Oklahoma in the second round. But Lewis dismisses critics who says he takes too many risks on players.

“There are players that we don’t touch. So, I don’t accept that we take a ‘risk’ on a player. We research players. If we feel a player can overcome challenges, we don’t view it as a risk. If we judge that he can’t overcome a challenge, we see that as risk and we’re not taking it. I’m not rolling any dice.”

He also pushes back on the criticism of some of his players, including Adam “Pacman” Jones and Vontaze Burfict, for their troubles on and off the field.

“Too many times, everyone just waits for one negative thing to happen and pile on,” he said, shaking his head. “People truly don’t appreciate all the positive things that these guys do.”

Lewis offers up a weary tone when I ask him what life is like as an NFL coach today. “It’s challenging, day-to-day. As the leader, you’re the one that’s charged with setting the direction and, as I say all the time, you’re expected to see ‘first,’ ‘most’ and ‘furthest.’ That’s your responsibility. You’ve got to set the plan, then develop the plan and then continually massage the plan all the way through.”

What’s the most difficult part of that leadership triangle?

“Seeing ‘most,’ because you have to see the pitfalls along the way, and understand that. You’ve got to bring people through those pitfalls, through tough times, even hold their hands sometimes. There are going to be ups and downs along the way, but you’ve got to stay the course and keep people focused on the ultimate goal. I really believe in staying on track. Sure, you’re allowed to change, but you’ve got to decide and articulate why you’re changing and when. If you lay the proper groundwork, you’ve got to feel comfortable about the course you’re taking.”

All year, coaches are on a constant, spinning wheel of leadership, preparation and hard work. All magnified during the season over three hours on game day.

“If you’ve prepared all week and you’re confident in your plan, then the games are all about execution. All your preparation and buildup is for when that game kicks off. So for me, it’s exciting to see how the guys are going to perform and play. The important part is we’ve got to execute and play the play, all the time. So, that’s our challenge as coaches, to get our guys, put them into position to execute and give us an opportunity to win.”

The losses wear on any coach, far more than the joy of the wins. Lewis truly hates the losses. “Losing is a hard feeling,” he said, rubbing his forehead as if to erase a tough loss.

“With a win, as coaches, we put it behind us very quickly and we move on to the next week. A loss hangs with you longer.”

But Lewis picks himself up to lead the organization past the loss and on to the next opponent.

“My job is to get everybody rebounded from the loss by the next day — 24 hours later. When I walk out of the office the next day, I’ve got to have everybody focused and moving forward to the next opponent. I can’t let it linger. We can make corrections, we can learn something from losing, but it’s my responsibility to get their heads cleared and refocused on the next opponent by Monday afternoon.”

Much of that success in moving on is determined by how Lewis carries himself in front of players, coaches and staff, and how they feed off his body language and attitude.

“That literally starts in the locker room after the game, which is my first opportunity to put my thoughts in their head. How well I do is reflected in their comments. So when I read their comments after the game, that indicates to me how well I did. Then I get a chance to reevaluate again after my comments to them on Monday, and I can see what they say after that. Those are the indicators where you can tell how effective you are.”

Lewis has been an effective teacher and leader of men for more than three decades. He’s been a role model to his players, who universally praise the way he treats them, and established a notable coaching tree, with former assistants — Jay Gruden, Mike Zimmer and Hue Jackson — now head coaches. He has done all this while being a pioneer when it comes to diversity on the sidelines. Lewis hasn’t been the perfect coach, or a game-day strategic chess master; he’s experienced plenty of failures and is routinely criticized, including by the local fan base. But over his 36 years coaching young men, Marvin Lewis has done it with dignified respect, pulling greatness out of a player who has never experienced it, continually coaching and teaching a player to reach the pinnacle of his potential.

“The most satisfying thing for me is when one of your players accomplishes something that many people doubted he could do. You see him bask in the glory of being successful. Ultimately, when every player gets to hoist up and hold that Super Bowl trophy, that’s the ultimate accomplishment. But even week-to-week, day-to-day, seeing the accomplishment of doing things that he doubted and others doubted. Seeing a player ascend, and continue to ascend, as they gain more and more confidence, and that player carves out more opportunity for him to do good things. That’s really satisfying.”

First-time head coaches Cower and Billick were role models

Marvin Lewis, on what he learned from working with former coaches Bill Cowher and Brian Billick.

On Cowher: “Bill has this ability to listen to the player and get them pointed in the right direction. Being a player himself, it was important to him to know what players felt and thought. He would give them a lot of room — they could flourish or they could hang themselves. He would put it out there: ‘If this is what you feel, then get it done.’ He was good that way. Our teams were tough, they were disciplined.”

On Billick: “I really learned about organization. Brian was ultra-organized and, much like Bill, listened to the players and provided the direction. Brian was good at dealing with the players, treating them like pros, and he let the coaches coach.”

On both: “They were first-time head coaches. That was a good experience and good for me to observe. Brian came more from the Bill Walsh, West Coast-style of doing things, where Bill was more like Marty Schottenheimer. I couldn’t have had two experiences as good as that.”

http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/Journal/Issues/2017/09/11/Opinion/From-The-Executive-Editor.aspx

It's easy to be calm and steady when you have an owner who's not going to fire you. Mike Brown will never fire Marvin Lewis.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 


    
This message has been edited by psychostats from IP address 70.92.18.131 on Sep 17, 2017 8:23 PM


 
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"Who's 'we', sukka?!?!?!?!"

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September 17 2017, 10:28 PM 

"“There are players that we don’t touch. So, I don’t accept that we take a ‘risk’ on a player. We research players. If we feel a player can overcome challenges, we don’t view it as a risk. If we judge that he can’t overcome a challenge, we see that as risk and we’re not taking it. I’m not rolling any dice.”"


"We"?

I'm sorry. I'm just finding that hilarious.


 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 20 2017, 7:50 PM 

Marvin being the winningest coach on Bungs history tells you all you need to know about the franchise.

NFL: 5 head coaches unlikely to return next season
George Stockburger - Fansided - September 19, 2017


Marvin Lewis

Bengals fans know the story with Marvin Lewis, the winningest coach in team history. Despite 15 seasons in Cincinnati Lewis has zero playoff wins in seven opportunities. He’s never been able to get the team past the finish line and the fanbase has lost its temper. ...

Unless Lewis wins a playoff game in 2017 his days in Cincinnati are likely done and his welcome overstayed.

https://nflmocks.com/2017/09/19/nfl-5-head-coaches-unlikely-return-next-season/3/


Mike Brown will never fire Marvin Lewis.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 


    
This message has been edited by psychostats from IP address 70.92.18.131 on Sep 20, 2017 7:51 PM


 
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5 Coaches that need to go

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September 20 2017, 10:12 PM 

https://nflmocks.com/2017/09/19/nfl-5-head-coaches-unlikely-return-next-season/


Psycho. Great article. I have more potentials...but here are the 1st 5 (arguably....NO THINKING REQUIRED):

1. Sean Payton. Really? Gee, ya think? I mean...you could argue that Payton has the hardware. But I think my dead dog Falco could have coached that team to a Lombardi. The article is correct on the user comments: SEAN PAYTON IS THE MARVIN LEWIS OF THE NFC.

2. Chuck Pagano. Really? You could possibly say that Andrew Luck's Career has SUFFERED due to his bungling. Luck has gotten worse over the years, even when he's not playing injured.

3. Doug Peterson. Yeah, like we all didn't see this. WTF is it with Philly hires? Andy Reid. Lame Duck and now Peterson. The guy is the worst game day HC since Dave Shula. Yes, that bad.

4. John Fox. Probably not his fault. Chicago Bears Team Management must share a braincell. They are pretty f*cking stupid.

5. Marvin. I don't think I need to say anything here that you guys don't already know. He's a total failure.


Here are some other possibilities:

6. Mike McCarthy. The Cheeseheads are on the verge of another season filled with injuries. Sure, not McCarthy's fault. I also like McCarthy's attitude. What is missing? Game Day Coaching. It's pretty terrible. He's lucky he's got 2 Offensive Coordinators. One is named Aaron Rodgers.

7. Kyle Shanahan. I didn't really understand the hire to begin with. I will just say it's "the 49ers being 'the 49ers'".

8. Hue Jackson. The ownership in Cleveland is really, really, really impatient. Everybody applauded the Browns for hiring Hue Jackson away from the Bungles. I wasn't wild about it. Did nothing in Oakland. But needed another chance. Another wrong environment. Hue may not get another chance after Cleveland.

9. Bruce Arians. Hear me out. Arians started out great. He may be wearing out his welcome. The Johnson Injury is simply bad luck and bad timing. And since inept Cardinal Management wants to keep Carson Palmer around and watch him struggle, the sands on Arians' hourglass could be running out.

10. Jim Caldwell. I can't understand why in the f*ck this guy is still coaching. Should have been put up in the Coordinator Booth Pasture a long time ago. I just don't get it. And Detroit has serious pieces of the puzzle that fit now. Jim Caldwell could f*ck up their puzzle on gamedays.

11. Bill O'Brien. If O'Brien coached on Prime Time against the Cincinnati Bungles every week, then his job would be totally secure. He doesn't. And this is just another example of a terrible front office that is impatient.

12. Doug Marrone. Another front office dumpster fire. That must be some kind of setup to try to coach for. Who knows what Doug Marrone could do with a real team?

13. Anthony Lynn. Probably was on the hot seat as soon as he took the job. LA Chargers have real personnel issues that will be blamed on the coach.

14. Sean McVey. Who wouldn't be on the hot seat coaching for a franchise like the Rams?

15. Mike Zimmer. Like tropical illnesses, Sam Bradford keeps on getting mysterious injuries. Not the coach's fault. But the fans in Minnesota were expecting big things out of their Purple People Eaters this year. If the playoffs fail to happen, then Zimmer may be looking for his next gig elsewhere.

16. Todd Bowles. Good lord. I should really put both NY Coaches on this list. Both are going to be blamed for front office failures.

17. Mike Murlarkey. 75% of the analysts picked the Titans to win the AFC South. Who knows? It could still happen. And if it doesn't, I have a feeling the other 3 teams are out in the South. If the Titans aren't representing, then it could mean big trouble for this coach.

18. Jay Gruden. The NFC East is a hotly contested conference right now. The Cowboys are decent. The Eagles (when Peterson isn't f*cking up the gameplan) can beat you. And the Giants can play defense. If Redskins don't find themselves in the playoffs this year, then all of Marvin's underlings may end up in the unemployment line. Wouldn't that be hilarious?


IMO, over half the league's coaches SHOULD BE on the hot seat. Marvin will probably sign another contract with Mike Brown though...even when his seat should be the hottest (for the last 5 years, at least).




    
This message has been edited by oldschoolerfan from IP address 73.66.45.113 on Sep 20, 2017 10:20 PM


 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 21 2017, 4:50 AM 

Zimmer may be available. The Vikings have been a hot mess since Norv Turner resigned midseason last year. I was mildly surprised that he made it through the offseason.

With that said knowing Mikey it will be Lazor promoted to head coach with Zampese being reinstated as OC, and Zimmer will be back at DC in 2019 when he is forgotten and cheap.


 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 21 2017, 8:06 PM 

I feel the need to review the fundamentals here. Recall back in the day, when the Brown Family had only minority, non-controlling ownership of the Bungles. Think 1990's. Mike Brown kept Dave Shula around for four and a half seasons after a combined record of 19-52 (0.268). Then came the internal hire of Bruce Coslet, who lasted slightly under four season with a record of 11-39 (0.220). Mike Brown never even fired Coslet, who had to take matters into his own hands and fire himself (resign).

In summary, that was 30 wins in slightly over eight seasons with only one true head coach firing.

Then came the internal hire of Dick LeBeau, who amazingly was fired after only slightly less than three seasons, but that included the worst record in franchise history: 2-14. His overall record was 12-33 (0.267). As you most certainly recall, a livid fan base forced Mike Brown's hand via mass season ticket defections, or the threat thereof.

That makes 42 wins in 11 season for a combined overall record of 42-124 (0.253) and not a single winning record or playoff appearance in the bunch. There wasn't even a legit playoff run during that span. All that resulted in only two head coaches being fired. That's an average of one head coach firing for every five and a half 4-12 seasons.

So in 2003 we finally get an external hire in Marvin Lewis. Over slightly more than 14 seasons, his overall record is 118-105-3 (0.529). That's an average record of roughly 8-8. He's only had two seasons where the number of wins was as low as four. He's had seven winning seasons and seven playoff appearances.

Now recall the other signs of Mike Brown's non-commitment to winning. After a devastating playoff loss to Pittsburgh after the 2005 season, Mike Brown showed his resolve by ripping off three straight non-winning seasons, including a 4-11-1 stinker in 2008. (Take that, Stoolers!)

Then, after an even more devastating loss to Pittsburgh after the 2015 season, Mike Brown again showed his resolve by failing to re-sign Marvin Jones, Mohammed Sanu, Kevin Zeitler, and Andrew Whitworth over the next two offseasons. Thus the Bungles were desperately short on wideouts last season and and are ridiculously poor in offensive linemen this season. (Take that, Stoolers!)

So please tell me what has changed to make Mike Brown any less content with Marvin Lewis. Really, I want to know because I just don't see it. His family has complete control of the franchise with a sweet stadium deal that guarantees profits. Their "rainy day fund" must be big enough by now to get them through another great flood. (Take that, Noah!) How can one not know by now that Mike Brown is a thoroughgoing one-off, and not in a good way?

Keep all that in mind when you read the Hot Seat entry in my following post.


    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 


    
This message has been edited by psychostats from IP address 70.92.18.131 on Sep 21, 2017 9:19 PM


 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 21 2017, 8:47 PM 

"And since inept Cardinal Management wants to keep Carson Palmer around and watch him struggle, the sands on Arians' hourglass could be running out. "

Interesting parallel to that and the bungs. Mikey wanted to keep Palmer around for much the same reason but Palmer absolutely refused to play another down and that was that. Palmer is now at the same stage as Manning was with Denver - pretty much injury ravaged - one more big hit might do it.

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 21 2017, 9:14 PM 

I've never listened to anything so disappointing in my life. Here's Paul Dehner, Jr. in the latest Bengals Beat Podcast with Jim Owczarski agreeing the whole time. That's right, both Enquirer beat writers.

This is like an edited transcript of the section that runs from 31:25 to 32:20. If I'm off by a few words it doesn't change the meaning.

Someone asked me today, Marvin's job should be on the line! It is! You don't think it isn't? He doesn't have a contract. He's making calls that he's never done, that this franchise has never done. The urgency is apparent. Everyone is playing for jobs. I've had multiple players talk about that. Be like, "You got to be like an idiot to not think that everybody around here hasn't realized we're all playing for jobs." Because, when the head coach doesn't have a contract, and team is spiralling, if the head coach doesn't come back, all the coaches are gone, and a new coaching staff comes in and all that. All these players are going to be gone. That's the reality of what happens when this season goes further sideways. Who knows, but to say he's not coaching for his job, I mean, for the first time since 2010 the guy doesn't have a contract beyond this year. That's all you need to know.

http://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/nfl/bengals/2017/09/21/bbp-2-learning-defense-green-bay/689136001/


Oh, for crying out loud. A full clean sweep of the coaching staff, no less. Not gonna happen. Think of the years left on various coaches contracts below Marvin.

These are the same two beat writers who, in an earlier podcast, helped Mike Brown take a victory lap in the 2016 offseason. Hey, he's made the playoffs five years in a a row. Continuity and all that. Nevermind that the Bungles failure to win a playoff game had reached epic proportions.

I'll stick with what I wrote earlier. This is not a hot seat situation. It's Hot Seat Theatre. Mike Brown is not going to fire Marvin Lewis. Not this year. Not ever.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 22 2017, 7:45 AM 

http://amp.usatoday.com/story/681943001/

Ol' reliable is at it again!

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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September 22 2017, 5:08 PM 

Yep, we might as well put down Nate Davis for 16 entries right now, lol.

NFL hot seat rankings: Trouble already brewing for Marvin Lewis' Cincinnati Bengals
Nate Davis - USA TODAY Sports - Sept 19, 2017

Firing up the hot seat watch in September may seem premature — a generally fair assessment — but any veteran coach will admit one is never safe when a team starts poorly. Just ask now-former Bengals offensive coordinator Ken Zampese, who'd been on the staff since 2003 but was terminated after last Thursday's loss. Yes, the coaching dominoes have officially begun to fall. ...

Here's the latest installment of our weekly hot seat rankings:

1. Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals: After that Week 2 defeat, normally reserved Pro Bowl WR A.J. Green openly questioned an offense that's scored nine points amid an 0-2 start — Cincy is the first team since 1939 to open with two home games and fail to score a touchdown in each — and Zampese was gone the next day. Still, ineptitude on a squad harboring plenty of talent and a mini-mutiny from his best player does not portend a bright outlook for Lewis, whose contract is up after the season. Last week: 3


http://amp.usatoday.com/story/681943001/


And the week prior...

NFL hot seat rankings: Colts' Chuck Pagano leads list of coaches who could be in trouble
Nate Davis - USA TODAY Sports - Sept 12, 2017

The NFL season is now a week old, but we all know it's not unheard of for teams to make coaching changes as early as September. Will the axe fall somewhere this month? Probably not. But will the proverbial coaching hot seats warm up as the autumn temperatures cool? Inevitably.

Here's this season's initial installment of our weekly hot seat rankings: ...

3. Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals: His deal expires after this season. He's never won a playoff game in 14 seasons and didn't even reach postseason last year. And, most concerning, his club laid a Week 1 goose egg for their lame duck coach. Not a good way to get another contract, even for a guy who's enjoyed owner Mike Brown's loyalty since 2003.


https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/2017/09/12/nfl-head-coach-hot-seat-rankings-colts-chuck-pagano-john-fox/658520001/


This is going to be sooooooooo tedious.




    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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October 3 2017, 8:18 PM 

I'll starting quoting Nate Davis in chunks from here on out. This time I'll include an excerpt about Hue Jackson, as a little hot seat bonus.

NFL hot seat rankings: Things going from bad to worse for Hue Jackson, Browns
Nate Davis - USA TODAY Sports Published - 7:10 p.m. ET Oct. 3, 2017

The calendar has flipped to October, when the temperatures get cooler, but the backsides get warmer for NFL coaches who aren't getting the job done.

Here's the latest installment of our weekly hot seat rankings:

1. Hue Jackson, Cleveland Browns: He can hear the pitchforks starting to rattle ... which may seem improbable given the number of empty seats sprouting up at Browns home games. But Jackson has spent recent days answering questions about whether his staff and Cleveland's front office have a fractured relationship and if there was any concern about his players quitting. That's what happens when you get blown out 31-7 by a Bengals team that hadn't won before Sunday. As for the Browns? They're now 1-19 under Jackson and have dropped 29 of 31 overall. Those kind of numbers hardly indicate a rebuild is headed in the proper direction. Last week: 6

...

3. Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals: What he does have is his first win of 2017. What he doesn't have is any guarantee of a new contract beyond this season. At least the Bengals have emerged from hibernation the past two weeks, perhaps in time to save their embattled coach. Last week: 1


https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/2017/10/03/nfl-hot-seat-rankings-hue-jackson-browns-ben-mcadoo-giants/729673001/


____________________________

NFL hot seat rankings: Things only look worse for Marvin Lewis' winless Cincinnati Bengals
Nate Davis - USA TODAY Sports - 5:02 p.m. ET Sept. 26, 2017

"You're fired" has been linked with the NFL this week in a manner few could have ever imagined. But President Trump's rhetoric aside, it is a harsh league reality that failing to produce in the win column will relegate coaches to the unemployment line in no time flat.

Here's the latest installment of our weekly hot seat rankings:

1. Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals: NFL Media reported Sunday morning that owner Mike Brown had previously "informed the coaching staff that the talent is not the problem" with his winless team. Then, despite their best performance of the season at Green Bay, the Bengals subsequently fell to 0-3, virtually guaranteeing consecutive seasons outside of the playoffs for lame duck Lewis, who's never won a postseason game in 14 years on the job. Last week: 1


https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/2017/09/26/nfl-hot-seat-rankings-marvin-lewis-winless-cincinnati-bengals-chuck-pagano-colts/705588001/


Marvin's job is safe, people.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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October 5 2017, 6:38 PM 

Here goes Daugherty again.

The 2017 story could be written as soon as Game 6 at Pittsburgh. Lose to the Bills and Steelers, drop to 1-5 and say goodbye in advance to MLewis and his entire staff. (Excepting Paul Alexander, whom I believe is a Bengal coach-for-life if he so chooses.) Win two, get right back in the game. Split two (the most likely scenario) stare down the barrel of a 2-4 start and a probable need to finish 8-2 to make January. Anyone see this team winning eight of 10 in this league?


http://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/blogs/daugherty-blog/2017/10/05/morning-line-105/106326770/


I'm going to quote this again in the Paul Alexander thread, but here I'll just let out another groan. Errrrgggghhhhhh!

Marvin Lewis is also coach for life, if he so chooses.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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October 8 2017, 4:22 PM 

Marvin Lewis may end up being coach of the year (depending if the Rams make the playoffs and if the Chiefs get the #1 seed in the AFC).

Mike Tomlin and the Steelers obviously stink. Right now, Marvin's righting of the ship recovering from an 0-3 start to win the division seems like a strong vote for coach of the year.

 
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win the division?

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October 8 2017, 4:43 PM 

You don't really think the Bungs will win the division do you?

Pitt and Balt are going to slug out like they normally do. Bungs will be also rans.
Mike Brown has already abused their hearts and raided their wallets. He has been a one-man plague of locusts -- Gregg Doyel

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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October 9 2017, 2:30 AM 

Honestly, no.

I do think that the Steelers have enough talent to turn things around in spite of their incompetent coaching. That is assuming that Ben can and will play better.

However, the Steelers already have two terrible losses to teams that the Bungs will probably beat, they still have Green Bay left on the schedule in terms of common difficult opponents, and they still have a first place schedule that includes New England and Kansas City. 9 wins may take the division.

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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October 22 2017, 3:53 PM 

Another Davis Double.


NFL hot seat rankings: Hue Jackson's winless Browns getting even worse
Nate Davis - USA TODAY Sports - 7:39 p.m. ET Oct. 17, 2017

The NFL's clustered standings — 22 of the league's 32 teams have between three and five victories — could mean a temporary reprieve for embattled coaches given almost all of them have an opportunity to claw their teams back to relevance. Still, it's fairly obvious who's got some margin for error and who doesn't. ...

3. Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals: On the plus side, it was a quiet bye week in Cincy. However the Pittsburgh Steelers also posted a huge win over the Kansas City Chiefs, creating further separation from the Bengals in a division that seems destined to have one playoff entry. Not a welcome development in a year when lame duck Lewis may need to reach January in order to survive. Last week: 4

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/2017/10/17/nfl-hot-seat-rankings-index-hue-jackson-winless-browns-ben-mcadoo/774247001/


NFL hot seat rankings: Matters get bleaker for Browns' Hue Jackson, Giants' Ben McAdoo
Nate Davis - USA TODAY Sports - 5:00 p.m. ET Oct. 10, 2017

Five weeks into the NFL season, there are still three winless teams, so hot seats seem more plentiful than freezing ones. And Kyle Shanahan, who heads the 0-5 San Francisco 49ers, need not be worried given he's a rookie coach armed with a six-year contract. But it's not difficult to find other coaches who should already be sweating as those temperatures underneath them swell. ...

4. Marvin Lewis, Cincinnati Bengals: After a horrific September, he's getting a reprieve. Lewis' club is playing much better, and a modest two-game winning streak leaves the Bengals just a game off the lead in a largely unimpressive AFC North. Hope springs eternal, even in Cincinnati. Last week: 3

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/2017/10/10/nfl-hot-seat-rankings-browns-hue-jackson-giants-ben-mcadoo/751682001//

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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November 5 2017, 9:14 PM 

I've had trouble finding hot seat examples lately. Maybe I'm not looking hard enough, but whatever. Here's one from a few weeks ago. Jim Owczarski makes it explicit this time. He says there's no in-season hot seat but that Marvin Lewis might lose his job at the end of the season.

That's right. That's what he said. Just about everybody else considers the threat of post-season firings as hot seat situations. This came after the loss in Pittsburgh.

But what of a loss at Heinz Field?

Well, 2-4 isn’t just that. It’s two games behind Pittsburgh (and down one in the tiebreaker column) to go with another divisional loss to Baltimore. Anything would be possible, sure, but, the odds get much, much longer. And a missed playoff berth would be two straight early vacations for the club.

To be clear: There would be no “hot seat.” Lewis would not be fired.

But, as such records are apt to do, it would create rampant speculation and discussion about Lewis’ future regardless.

Another losing record or missed playoff berth might be enough for the Bengals to say 15 years was enough, however, with the thought that the cupboard has been replenished with young players and another strong draft and new voice may be what’s needed to move things in the right direction.

Rest assured that with no head coach under contract for 2018, the Bengals did not enter this season without a list of possible head coaching candidates.


https://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/nfl/bengals/2017/10/22/bengals-xtra-steelers-can-shape-marvin-lewis-coaching-future-colin-kaepernick-nfl-theater/786198001/


Marvin is supposedly in jeopardy of losing his job in January. That qualifies as an entry, and most of the examples in this thread are of the same ilk.

By the way... Mike Brown is not going to fire or otherwise part ways with Marvin Lewis. Unless Marvin himself gets sick of it all and walks away.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: The Perpetual Marvin Lewis Hot Seat Roundup

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November 5 2017, 9:27 PM 

I guess this one qualifies, however soft-sold in may be. Paul Daugherty yet again!

There is a chance the Bengals will have a new coach after this season. There is always that chance, of course. But with Marvin Lewis operating without a contract after this year and the fans as twitchy as ever, there is a better chance of new blood than in any year since the Lost Season of 2010, also known as the T.Ocho No Show.

This isn’t a plea for Lewis’ dismissal. Far from it. Some of us still believe Marvin the culture-changer has earned a few more at-bats. There’s lots of season to be played, lots of jobs to be saved. In the socialist NFL, most coaches are never further from salvation than a three-game winning streak. No one’s running Lewis out.


https://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/columnists/paul-daugherty/2017/11/04/doc-do-cincinnati-bengals-need-go-old-school-replace-marvin-lewis/831730001/


What do you mean,"there's always that chance"? Yeah, like there's always a chance an asteroid could fall out of the sky tomorrow and hit Paul Brown Stadium. But there's no realistic chance of Mike Brown ending the relationship.


    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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