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Paul Brown Sucked First

December 5 2017 at 6:26 PM
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I guess the old stuff here on the father is scattered about over multiple threads. Time to consolidate it all into one easy reference point. The purpose is show how Mike Brown takes after his pops in all the wrong ways, and the ill-will among Bungles fans started well before the old legend died. Keep in mind that this is probably the best way to get under the son's skin.

First, let's look at Paul's historical won-loss record. The first 20 years of the posthumous peiod are added for reference.

[linked image]

You'll note that it was going downhill after 1955. More to come as a trawl through our MBS archives.

Data sources:
http://www.bengals.com/news/article-1/Who-Dey-Perspective-The-Paul-Brown-Legacy-Part-II/8bd02df5-26a2-4171-a0cc-8f52ee4a06e7
http://www.bengals.com/news/article-1/Who-Dey-Perspective-The-Paul-Brown-Legacy/cb837f63-6b97-4c0e-9887-f445f9c90920

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 


    
This message has been edited by psychostats from IP address 70.92.18.131 on Dec 6, 2017 9:35 PM


 
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Re: Paul Brown Sucked First

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December 5 2017, 6:42 PM 

The stats broken down into more detail:

[linked image]

From an old thread:

... I refer you again to Andrew O'Toole and his bio on Paul Brown: The Rise and Fall and Rise Again of Football's Most Innovative Coach. If you haven't read it already then you should, especially Chapter 10.

Brown made a major, major trade without consulting or even notifying the owner, Art Modell (Bobby Mitchell for Ernie Davis.) His players' discontent with the team's direction was becoming public knowledge. He traded away a good quarterback for a lesser one. And in many ways his unbending nature was catching up to him. O'Toole:
The natural course of change that occurs with each succeeding generation was obvious in the complaints that emanated from the Cleveland clubhouse. Brown's greatest success had been built on the back of men who had fought Hitler and Hirohito. The oppressive nature of Brown's coaching philosophy was not odious to these men, who had served their country under dire circumstances. Indeed, the culture had changed. The young men now charging into battle for Brown on Sunday afternoons were different from those who took the field in 1946, or 1950, for that matter. Blind faith in the head coach was a thing of the past, and Brown was slow to understand this transformation. He also refused to acknowledge the growing sense of independence found in the modern athlete. Who among the current crop of players had earned a championship with Brown? Paul may have been a legend, but to his players Brown's was a soft reputation. What have you done for me lately? This football genius was a thing of the past.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/90650/thread/1301789687

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Milt Plum

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December 6 2017, 9:09 PM 

Otto Graham, the original bell-cow quarterback, retired from football for good after the 1955 season. Paul Brown never lived up to his legendary status again. Here's an old post of mine from 2010. The link to the article is long dead, so I will post the entire thing shortly.

Who was Paul Brown's quarterback after Otto Graham retired? Milt Plum was the next guy to become established. A pretty good player, too. His QB rating in 1960 -- calculated retrospectively by historians -- was over 110, currently the sixth best ever. But PB tossed him aside for daring to be more than an automaton. Another informative profile from Pro Football Weekly:
Not that it bothered Plum to ruffle the coaches' feathers a little. When he signed his first contract in 1957, he was given an $11,000 base with a $2,000 bonus. The next year asked for an increase to $13,000, and when the contract showed up at his New Jersey home with an offer of $12,000, Plum sent it back unsigned.

"You had nobody to help you back then. Well, I got to camp and Paul Brown came up to me, his teeth grinding, face all red, and looked me in the face and said 'Nobody's ever done that to me before.'"

- snip -

[B]y the end of the 1961 season [Plum] had delivered four winning seasons in a row. He was widely considered one of the game's best passers and field generals. And then, in a blink, he was on his way out of Cleveland.

"A newspaper guy (Chuck Heaton of the Cleveland Plain Dealer) got me traded," Plum says. "My neighbor told me on a Thursday that I was headed to Detroit. He'd heard it on the radio. I got a telegram from the Browns on Friday afternoon stating they didn't know how to get ahold of me. Well, my number was in the book, pretty sure the office had my address. I thought that was childish in a way, couldn't make a phone call."

Typical Paul Brown, says Plum.

"I don't think he ever faced anybody to tell them they were cut. It was always done by another method."

According to Plum, Heaton was interested in doing a story on what Browns players did in the offseason. The two met at the team's facility where the men talked about family and offseason jobs. "Then he comes out with an article that said, 'Plum says if we had had an audible system we would have won the championship.' I thought someone from the Browns would have called me and asked if it were true, but no, I was traded."

http://www.profootballweekly.com/2010/05/25/forgotten-milt-plum

We can learn a little more of the story from Andrew O'Toole, in his oft cited bio on PB. Among other things, Plum is supposed to have said, "I compare us to an auto with a top speed of 70 miles an hour. We can't go any faster no matter what the situation."

Immediately prior to Plum being traded, star running back Jim Brown publicly supported his quarterback. "I think Milt gave constructive criticism that was well thought out." O'Toole goes on:
As Jim Brown knew, his coach cared nothing of constructive criticism, not when the criticism was directed at his methods. Nor did Paul concern himself with the feelings of his players. Jim's words were politically motivated. By throwing his support behind his quarterback, he was letting the world, and Paul, know that Plum was not alone in his frustration."

(From Paul Brown: The Rise and Fall and Rise Again of Football's Most Innovative Coach, pp. 286-87)
Brown, as we also learn from O'Toole, insisted that the trade was strictly a football move. "For some time we have wanted an active running type of quarterback to broaden our offense."

Yeah, sure, Paul. Anything you say.


Link to original thread:
http://www.network54.com/Forum/90650/thread/1275360983


    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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More on Plum

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December 6 2017, 9:33 PM 

Full article from Pro Football Weekly. (The old, original site.) This is otherwise not online as far as I can tell.

Forgotten: Milt Plum
Mike Beacom - Pro Football Weekly - Posted May 25, 2010 @ 8:39 a.m. ET

It happens to Milt Plum all the time. He meets someone new, and in the course of conversation reveals that he used to play professional football. "Then they'll look me up on the Internet and the next time I'll see them they'll tell me what a great career I had," he says, amused by it all.



For a brief period of time, Plum was the game's most efficient passer, as evidenced by the three straight years he led the league in completion percentage (1959-61). But that was a different time, a different game. The secret, he says, was simple. "We threw short." Well, that and he handed the ball to Jim Brown and Bobby Mitchell an awful lot.



A product of Penn State, Plum had seen plenty of Brown already during the annual clashes between the Nittany Lions and Syracuse. He was thrilled to be selected in the second round of the 1957 NFL draft (held in December of 1956) after the team had already picked up Brown with the No. 6 overall selection. 

When Plum stood under center for Paul Brown's Cleveland teams of the late 1950s and early '60s, he managed the offense as well as the coach could have hoped.

There was no passer rating at the time, but football historians revealed long ago that Plum's 1960 season produced one of the greatest ratings of his or any era — a 110.4 (sixth-best all time, and one of only two all-time top-10 passer ratings posted before 1984). That year he threw 21 touchdowns and just five interceptions, completing 60.4 percent of his passes. The next highest passer rating of 1960 belonged to Philadelphia's Norm Van Brocklin (86.5).



Teams of that era threw when they had to, and most of the time passing was saved for third down and long. But the Browns were different because Paul Brown was different, and, as Plum points out, because the offense was limited in its number of downfield weapons. 

"I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings, but in Cleveland we only had one deep threat — Ray Renfro," Plum says.

At one point, Plum petitioned the coaching staff to move Mitchell to flanker and put Preston Carpenter back in the backfield, but the coaching staff would have none of it. Everyone wanted two backs, he says, not a fleet of receivers or a balanced attack. "Green Bay had (Paul) Hornung and (Jim) Taylor … that was the way to go back then. You're not going to throw the ball with two big backs."

Not that it bothered Plum to ruffle the coaches' feathers a little.

When he signed his first contract in 1957, he was given an $11,000 base with a $2,000 bonus. The next year asked for an increase to $13,000, and when the contract showed up at his New Jersey home with an offer of $12,000, Plum sent it back unsigned.

"You had nobody to help you back then. Well, I got to camp and Paul Brown came up to me, his teeth grinding, face all red, and looked me in the face and said 'Nobody's ever done that to me before.'

"They told you back then that your contract was between you and your wife. No one else. You just didn't discuss it. You could be making $13,000 as a starter and your backup could make $17,000 if he was a better negotiator. And nobody got more than a two-year contract."

If anything, Plum believed he had earned the pay increase.

"My first year we had something like six quarterbacks in camp. You got to throw like every third day. And then a couple would leave and (Paul) Brown would bring one or two more in. Most guys, he'd bring them into the office and say 'We're counting on you, make arrangements to bring your family in.' Never said that to me."

But Plum stuck and eventually won his coach over, and by the end of the 1961 season had delivered four winning seasons in a row. He was widely considered one of the game's best passers and field generals. And then, in a blink, he was on his way out of Cleveland.

"A newspaper guy (Chuck Heaton of the Cleveland Plain Dealer) got me traded," Plum says. "My neighbor told me on a Thursday that I was headed to Detroit. He'd heard it on the radio. I got a telegram from the Browns on Friday afternoon stating they didn't know how to get ahold of me. Well, my number was in the book, pretty sure the office had my address. I thought that was childish in a way, couldn't make a phone call."

Typical Paul Brown, says Plum.

"I don't think he ever faced anybody to tell them they were cut. It was always done by another method."

According to Plum, Heaton was interested in doing a story on what Browns players did in the offseason. The two met at the team's facility where the men talked about family and offseason jobs. "Then he comes out with an article that said, 'Plum says if we had had an audible system we would have won the championship.' I thought someone from the Browns would have called me and asked if it were true, but no, I was traded."

And that was that. In Detroit, Plum's career was never the same. His completion percentage ranked among the league's best in 1962 and ’64, but the Lions struggled and with it came a high number of interceptions.

In 1968, Plum was ready to retire when George Allen convinced him to play for the Rams.
"I asked Allen if I had a chance to start and he said, 'yes.' Well, that was false. He and Roman Gabriel were like twins."

In 1969, Plum gave it one more shot, agreeing to join Allie Sherman in New York, but by the time the exhibition season was over Sherman had been moved out of town, leaving Plum to sit and watch Fran Tarkenton play every Sunday.

Following his career Plum worked in the wood products industry before settling in North Carolina in the early 1970s. These days the 75-year-old plays golf Tuesdays and Thursdays, tennis two or three times a week, mows his own lawn, and does a little wood-working when the mood strikes.

Once a year, he makes a trip up north to visit his old quarterback coach from his playing days at Penn State — Joe Paterno. He always visits on a Friday when Joe handles his media duties, just for five minutes to shake the 83-year-old Paterno's hand and say 'hello.'

And to this day Plum says he still gets fan mail every month.

"I got one from a guy in prison once. Couldn't get his son anything for Christmas, wondered if I would send a picture."

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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I think people forget how many things Paul Brown did that were wrong besides have a son

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December 7 2017, 6:15 PM 

Of course as a Bungs fan the biggest thing PB did wrong was not picking Bill Walsh to be his successor (and blackballing Walsh from getting another NFL job, according to Walsh).

You take the 1975 Bungs, coming off a record of 11-3 and you add Bill Walsh as a coach and talent evaluator, with 2 first round picks, 2 second rounds picks, 2 third round picks, 2 fourth round picks, and 2 fifth round picks in the 1976 draft... fuggedabowdit. That team would have won multiple Super Bowls.

https://www.prosportstransactions.com/football/DraftTrades/Years/1976.htm

Mike Brown has already abused their hearts and raided their wallets. He has been a one-man plague of locusts -- Gregg Doyel

 
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The Bill Walsh Thing

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December 7 2017, 9:27 PM 

Thanks for bringing that up, Freeze. Here are a couple of excerpts from references cited on Wikipedia and an extra bonus excerpt from O'Toole again.


Living Legend, by Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times, December 22, 2006.
Not everyone in the NFL had such faith in Walsh's decisions. He was a Cincinnati Bengals assistant for seven seasons under legendary coach Paul Brown but was passed over in favor of Bill "Tiger" Johnson when Brown retired in 1975. Walsh, who subsequently resigned, said Brown "worked against my candidacy" to be a head coach anywhere in the league.

"All the way through I had opportunities, and I never knew about them," he said. "And then when I left him, he called whoever he thought was necessary to keep me out of the NFL."

Was it jealousy?

"I can't say," said Walsh, who didn't get his first NFL head-coaching job until he was 47. "He did that to other people too, it wasn't just me. But I was probably the most blatant one."


http://articles.latimes.com/2006/dec/22/sports/sp-walsh22/3


The Blind Side, Chapter 5, by Michael Lewis. Norton 2006.
In 1971, Virgil Carter, who had never completed as many as half of his passes, somehow led the entire league in completion percentage (62.2) and bumped his yards per attempt from 5.9 to 7.3. The Bengals surprised everyone and won their division. The next year Carter gave way to Ken Anderson, a little known passer out of even less well known Augustana College, who hadn’t completed even half his passes in college. In Walsh’s offense, Kenny Anderson did even better than Virgil Carter. When he saw Anderson play, Walsh later said, he realized that the offense he had designed to compensate for a weak-armed quarterback had a more general effectiveness; this passing game of his could survive on very little talent, but it could also exploit better material. In 1974, Anderson led the league in completion percentage and total yards and yards per attempt (8.13). After the Mad Stork ended the 1975 season, and Paul Brown retired, Walsh expected to take over as head coach. Brown had several times refused other NFL teams permission to interview Walsh for their head coaching jobs, without bothering to mention their interest to Walsh. Instead, Brown had told Walsh that he arranging for another coach to replace him. “The selection of head coaches in the NFL always has been a mystery to me,” said Walsh not long afterwards. “I expect to be a head coach. I want to be a head coach. He really is the game. Everybody else are production people in his show.”


Paul Brown: The Rise and Fall and Rise Again of Football's Most Innovative Coach, Chapter 14, by Andrew O'Toole. Clerisy Press, 2008.
On several occasions in the past few years, Brown intimated to Walsh that he was the heir apparent. However, Brown had made similar statements to Tiger Johnson in the same time span. Walsh was a budding genius, and Brown recognized his offensive brilliance. Still Walsh was emotionally volatile. His kinetic energy in the midst of games sometimes chafed Brown. When the time came to make a decision, Brown knew exactly what he was getting in Johnson. Walsh? He was a little too photogenic; he liked being in front of the camera too much. He was a wild card.


A little too photogenic? This comes off a lot worse than Paul Brown merely making a wrong decision.

EDIT:

It occurs to me that we can explain away that unfortunate decision made 43 years ago. To paraphrase a certain someone:

Legends are like queen bees. You can only have one before they start stepping on each other. And we already have ours.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 


    
This message has been edited by psychostats from IP address 70.92.18.131 on Dec 9, 2017 10:52 PM


 
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Tiger Johnson was 1970s Paul Alexander

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December 8 2017, 4:01 PM 

As coach:

Cincinnati Bengals (1968–1975)
(Offensive line coach)
Cincinnati Bengals (1976–1978)
(Head coach)
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1979–1982)
(Offensive line coach)
Detroit Lions (1983–1984)
(Offensive line coach)
Cincinnati Bengals (1985–1990)
(Tight ends coach)


Nobody ever hired him to be a head coach again after his brief stint in Cincy, where he inherited a team on the cusp of greatness and helped it do nothing at all.
Mike Brown has already abused their hearts and raided their wallets. He has been a one-man plague of locusts -- Gregg Doyel

 
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Re: Paul Brown Sucked First

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December 9 2017, 9:55 PM 

A 70's Paul Alexander? That's a scary thought. I wonder if Tiger Johnson ever played the piano.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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Re: Paul Brown Sucked First

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December 9 2017, 10:18 PM 

I know I've typed this out before, but I can't find the old post. Anyway, here is my favorite excerpt from O'Toole's book. This is in regard to the 1962 season, Paul Brown's last at Cleveland. As you read through it, ask yourself if it reminds you of anyone.

Earlier in the year, on January 15, Blanton Collier rejoined Brown's coaching staff. Collier had been dismissed from Kentucky a few weeks earlier after eight years as the Wildcats' head coach. UK boosters never quite took to Collier. They didn't believe the soft-spoken teacher was tough enough to succeed in Kentucky. He won, he just didn't win enough. Toward the end, the Colliers began to receive menacing phone calls at their home. Collier was even hung in effigy on campus. Finally, following a 5-5 1961 season, the university bought out the final three years of his contract.

Brown reached out to his friend. "How would you like to come back to Cleveland?" he asked.

Collier appreciated the offer, but he refused the proposal if it meant that any of Brown's assistants would be let go to make room for him. Brown assured him all the coaches would return. This was no act of charity. Brown recognized Collier's genius for the game, and gave him responsibility to match his brilliance. Besides, it felt good to have a confederate in a splintering clubhouse. And in Collier, Brown was certain he would always have an ally.

During the exhibition season Brown gave Collier some leeway and allowed him to experiment with a check-off system. The results were obvious to all: a 5-0 record in preseason, and an offense that was more productive than any Browns unit had been in years. Frank Gibbons penned a laudatory piece extolling the virtues of Collier's new system.

The article effectively brought the check-off plan to an end. Why? Though he never commented on it, the unanimous opinion was that Brown didn't appreciate his assistant receiving credit. Though a petty thought, there was no other conclusion to draw. It was becoming increasingly obvious that Brown was holding steadfast to old tactics. And it wasn't just the offense. The defensive players were practically in complete revolt. Brown knew nothing of defensive tactics and strategy, they claimed. Howard Brinker could put together a good defensive game plan, but Brown would bully his brilliant but mild-mannered assistant. They were better than the Giants, to a man every Brown believed this. Yet, they also know the Giants would whip their *** when they played. This inevitability was tearing the team apart at the seams. Why couldn't Brown listen? To his coaches? To anyone?


Paul Brown: The Rise and Fall and Rise Again of Football's Most Innovative Coach (by Andrew O'Toole, 2008, Clerisy Press). Chapter 10, pages 245-246.


Stubborn, steadfast, wrongheaded, to the point of driving others over the edge. Out of touch. Old ineffective tactics. More concerned with doing things his way than getting good results.

There's also the thing about hogging credit, so in that way the father was worse than his son.

    _______________________________________
    Bell-cow quarterbacks are like queen bees. Only one can take you to the land of milk and honey.
      ~ What Mike Brown should have said, versus what he did say.
 

 
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