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Simulating Rust on Muffler

May 20 2003 at 4:55 AM
D. McKeever  (no login)
from IP address 24.199.93.101

How does one mix a convicning color for rest. I am unpersuaded by the commerical offerings. Also, on the muffler of a tank, how does one simuluate the rough texture that arises from the severe heat....?

Best Wishes,

David

 
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AuthorReply
D. McKeever
(no login)
24.199.93.101

*rust (not rest) nt

May 20 2003, 5:02 AM 

nt

 
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Ian Barraclough
(no login)
195.92.67.65

Rust

May 20 2003, 6:08 AM 

I use two methods:
1) Coat the item to be rusted(?) in white glue (wood glue), then dip it into baking soda. Blow off the excess baking soda and allow to dry. Then paint with thinned Humbrol 62, and wash with black oils.

2) Paint the part with any rust coloured paint, then spinkle ground down artists pastels (Chalks). I use a number of colours, mainly brick red and dark rust. Again allow to dry and wash with dark coloured oils.

You also could try a mixture of the two ideas, just experiment...
Hope this helps

Ian

 
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D. McKeever
(no login)
24.199.93.101

Can you do this post base-coat?

May 20 2003, 6:27 AM 

Is it possible to use either of these techiques after the base coat has been applied?

Best Wishes,

David

 
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Ian Barraclough
(no login)
195.92.67.69

Rust answers

May 20 2003, 7:13 PM 

The above methods can be used after a base coat, but are better off done raw, i.e with no base coat. If you can leave the parts off 'till after the primer than it will look better.

Ian

 
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Tom Herling
(no login)
208.219.109.225

Rusty finish

May 20 2003, 7:17 AM 

Another method is to mix various rust shades with talc (or baby powder).

Martyn Welch's "The Art of Weathering" is a must-read for any modeler. Although it's written for the railroad types, all of his ideas for weathering techniques are applicable to armor, as are his methods for weathering buildings.

I ordered my copy through Amazon.uk. I don't know if you can get it through any American domestic bookseller.

Tom

 
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Mark Clark
(no login)
129.93.9.64

Rust

May 20 2003, 9:19 AM 

After finding this idea in a model mag I use liquid paper for texture. It not only gives me the surface I want but the parting line disappears if the muffler is in two parts or more. I use it on barrels or any where I want to get rid of cracks or lines and after it dries it is sandable. I paint my mufflers with testors rust and a light wash of black.
MKC

 
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D. McKeever
(no login)
24.199.93.101

Thanks all

May 20 2003, 12:36 PM 

I am going to try the talc method. WHen I went to the drug store, I only remembered talcum powder. I wish I remembered that talcum powder and talc were the same thing. I was told that I did purchase is talc powder, but it does not say talcum powder anywhere.

Best Wishes,

David

 
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Brian Dumas
(no login)
209.221.142.132

Talc is being phased out

May 20 2003, 2:26 PM 

Here in the States, talc is being replaced by cornstarch.
Talc has been found to be a carcinogen at high enough levels, and generally dangerous to babies (who are exposed to it the most).
That may be why you can't find it listed anywhere.

BAD

 
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Brian Fendley
(no login)
67.41.36.61

liquid cement and baking soda for texture and paint....

May 23 2003, 4:51 AM 

.........It worked for me.

 
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Eugene Monasterio
(no login)
65.141.1.107

Simulating Rust

May 30 2003, 1:26 AM 

I like to use real rust. I take a brillo pad (without the soap) stick a toothpick through the middle and put it over the top of a baby food jar or similar container, and wet it with water. Let it sit for a day and keep adding water or alcohol until it gets completely rusted. Then you can grind it into dust. I then paint Tamiya Hull red on the part to be weathered and while still wet, I brush on the rust. Takes alittle practice but looks good.

 
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