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Turpentine questions

June 11 2006 at 12:40 AM
Trevor Horton  (Login tshintl)
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from IP address 65.189.107.92

I'm about to start using Mig pigments and need turpentine. What is a good brand of turpentine to buy in the US that works well with pigments? I'm working with 1:72 scale models if that matters.

Also, doesn't turpentine cause problems with the base coat of paint?

 
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AuthorReply
Mark Dunck
(Login MarkDunck)
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24.236.142.241

Turpentine = Bad, Turpenoid = Good

June 11 2006, 9:15 AM 

Try finding Turpenoid. Walmart craft section or just about any craft store should have it. It is way less costic than turpentine. I have had turpentine not only eat my base coat of paint but also removed quite abit of glued on parts as well. Very bad expieriance, trying to keep parts from going down the drain as I franticly tried rinsing off the turpentine before it did more damage.

I have never had a problem with turpenoid, but I always spray gloss, add decals, spray gloss, than spray dull coat than turpenoid/oil washes.

HTH,
Mark

 
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Mike Land
(Login landm)
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68.214.17.72

Just be sure...

June 11 2006, 12:54 PM 

...if you go the turpenoid route to get "turpenoid" and not "turpenoid natural". The turpenoid natural is a totally different creature and should NEVER be used for applying washes, pigments, etc. (unfortunately I know this from experience )

Mike

 
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david nickels
(Login djnick66)
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71.100.204.85

Turpenoid with the Blue/White lable

June 12 2006, 9:50 AM 

Is the stuff to get. Its made by Weber and sold in art shops. The BAD stuff comes with a green lable.

 
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Trevor Horton
(Login tshintl)
Missing-Lynx members
65.189.107.92

Turpenoid

June 11 2006, 1:27 PM 

So Turpenoid will work fine with Mig pigments? I was going to apply the turpentine (or turpenoid) over the pigment from what I read in an article about Mig pigments.

 
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Mike Carroll
(Login mikejcarroll)
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64.203.185.243

Turpinoid and Mig Powders

June 11 2006, 3:52 PM 

I've had success with Turpinoid and Mig Powders. FWIW, Mig bottles his "own" special thinner for powders, but I suspect it's similar to Turpinoid.

If you're mixing powders and turpinoid, remember that a little (powder and washing) goes a long way, and it's reallly difficult, if not impossible to see the effects until it dries. I learned from experience that if you think you don't have enough, do NOT add more while still wet. You can always add more coats, and it's easy to overdue it.

Good luck,

Mike Carroll

 
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david nickels
(Login djnick66)
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71.100.204.85

MIG thinner

June 12 2006, 9:53 AM 

Smells, feels and seems to be the same refined mineral spirits as Testors brush cleaner/thinner. Excpet the MIG bottle is $11 USD.

 
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Dmitry Kiyatkin
(Login Kiyatkin)
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162.129.250.1

Same stuff to me...

June 12 2006, 4:24 PM 

Dave, I agree that is what it is. But works well. Dmitry




Dmitry Kiyatkin
Baltimore, Maryland
http://www.ww2models.com

 
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Trevor Horton
(Login tshintl)
Missing-Lynx members
65.189.107.92

Thanks!

June 12 2006, 11:47 PM 

Thanks for all the info everyone. I will be getting some turpenoid to use instead of turpentine. Checked a couple hardware stores in my area tonight and none had or even heard of it before. Will try a Michaels craft store tomorrow and a few other craft/art stores to try and find it.

 
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Adam Wilder
(Login anpwilder)
MODERATORS ONLY - Constructive comments
81.36.94.238

MIG Thinner

June 13 2006, 2:28 AM 

Dear Trevor

If you follow the link below you will find that the MIG thinner (PS.239) is currently available only in 75ml bottles. These 75ml bottles retail for 4.2€, which is around the same in US dollars. I have no idea where Dave is getting $11.

http://www.migproductions.com/paginas%20products/pigments.htm

If you click on the picture you will find I bit more information about this product.

Thank you and please inform me of any further questions you might have.
ANPW

 
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david nickels
(Login djnick66)
Missing-Lynx members
71.100.204.208

Uhhhh try VLS

June 13 2006, 3:05 PM 

They sell MIG thinner for $11.95 but they recently marked it down to $9. When i got it wholesale it had the $11 MSRP.

 
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Trevor Horton
(Login tshintl)
Missing-Lynx members
65.189.107.92

MIG Thinner question

June 13 2006, 10:17 PM 

Adam,

I saw that MIG thinner at my local hobby store where I bought the MIG pigments from. What I'm looking to do is apply the pigments and be able to seal the entire model afterwards to protect it without disturbing the pigments and all the weathering.

Am I correct in that if you put turpentine/turpenoid or this MIG thinner over your pigments once applied to the model, it will prevent the pigment from coming off when spraying the finished model? If the MIG thinner does this then I will just get that as I know my local hobby store has some and I haven't yet found any turpenoid.

I'm nervous that that the pigment powder will move around when applying a thinner over it. This is the first time I will be attempting pigments so am a bit nervous.

Thanks,

Trevor

 
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david nickels
(Login djnick66)
Missing-Lynx members
71.101.160.105

It is easier to do than you probably think

June 14 2006, 9:14 AM 

I wondered about the pigments myself, before I actually used them. They are really pretty simple and pretty much fool proof.

Mig Pigments stick pretty well, and you can either dust them on lightly, pile them on, or even grind them in with a stiff brush. If you apply them dry, even thick so they pile up like dirt, when you flow some thinner on with a brush, you dont have to touch the pigments themselves. Just sort of flow it on from the side and capillary action will wet everything down. This sort of sets the pigments, but does not make them particularly permanent. They can be rubbed off. You could also dust up a model, then airbrush on a light wash of thinner.

You don't even have to use Mig thinner. You could use Tamiya thinner, rubbing/isopropyl alcohol, Testors thinner/brush cleaner, Turpenoid, etc. Water would bead up, but any other solvent will flow nicely.

I found if I airbrush a very light coat of clear flat on the model, the pigments are not disturbed MUCH. You might loose, say 10% of the effect. Now, if you flood the clear flat on, or use a spray can, you reduce the effects of the pigments greatly. This can be used to an advantage, too. If you dont like the effect, it can be toned down with an airbrush. If I want a whole area to look "dusted" I will usually airbrush on a base coat of dust colored paint like Tamiya Buff or Tamiya Earth. You can also mix the Mig pigments with clear flat varnish to tint it the pigment shade. You can then apply loose pigments or a pigment wash on top of this for more depth.

 
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Dmitry Kiyatkin
(Login Kiyatkin)
Missing-Lynx members
151.196.250.90

We are making it too complicated.

June 14 2006, 12:05 PM 

Hi Trevor,

Reading all this stuff about pigments makes me anxious. They are a fun, different, and easy way to make models better. They rub off with your fingertip off flat surfaces no matter what you use to fix them. You can also apply them as a wash with water, alcohol, turpeniod, or any solvent that will no damage base color. MiG's thinner I would save for washes anyways.

Have fun with this. Do not start on a model you spend 2 months building. Buy one off EBay for $20. Get a modern tank as they are cheaper. You can freely practice on this and enjoy yourself.

Try this article: http://missing-lynx.com/rare_world/rw05.htm

Also, if you have the funds, get the MiG FAQ book (4 week wait on Amazon for $50 and instant gratification at http://www.redlancers.com for $80). The book is very useful to learn more about these modern methods. MiG's website can also be of much use. Try his forums too.

Basically, pigments will likely not reinvent the way your models look as you can create all the effects without this medium, but they do make it easier and quicker.

HTH, Dmitry



Dmitry Kiyatkin
Baltimore, Maryland
http://www.ww2models.com

 
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Kevin (Bluey ) Brenton
(Login Kevin.BII)
Missing-Lynx members
220.235.118.180

Re: MIG Thinner question

June 15 2006, 8:09 PM 

I use a spray called Matte Fixative ,it used by artists to fix pastels and charcol on drawings with out reducing the effect of the pastels or charcol.It's available at artist supply stores .In fact I have a can of the gloss and the semi gloss as well as the matte.

Kevin (Bluey)
"I'm not young enough to know every thing"

 
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